A Woman in UniformJUL 07

An NYPD officer anonymously shares what it's like to be a cop in NYC.

I'm walking in Boerum Hill on one of the first really good days of summer. It's been a long week but I'm feeling good in a flowing sundress and sandals, relieved to be freed from what I've begun to think of as my blue polyester prison. I look up and realize with amusement that I'm walking by an actual prison, or, to be precise, a jail: Brooklyn Central Booking.

The doors to the courtroom lobby open and a man emerges, pausing to survey the street. He's a little scruffy but then the newly arraigned usually are -- there aren't many opportunities to freshen up in the holding cells. He has an open, pleasant face, and the recognition on my part is immediate. My heart sinks as I see him cross the street and make a beeline for me.

"Miss? Miss?" He doesn't sound particularly confrontational and I give him my best blank smile, hoping he has some kind of mundane procedural question.

"I don't mean to like bother you or anything, but if you're not busy, and a beautiful lady such as yourself is probably busy, but if you're not busy I'd love to buy you a cup of coffee."

Now I have to grin. This is my new favorite person in the world. What chutzpah! I'm so delighted by this guy that I almost chuck him on the shoulder. Then it hits me. He doesn't recognize me, at all. He has no idea that I'm the person who arrested him two nights before.

(via @choire, who called it "BY FAR the most interesting thing i read all week")

  quick links, updated constantly

What's the best medium for a storyteller in 2015? Films? TV? Games? Comics?

Fun profile of Billy Mitchell, the first person to perfect Pac-Man and one of the best video game players alive

Before radio navigation, airplanes navigated by railway or via a network of lighthouses & giant concrete arrows

The Myth of Big, Bad Gluten

Summer 2015 edition of Gout "Our Deputy Editor Married a Finance Guy; Check Out the Sick Kitchen In Her Weekend Home"

Amazon will try to 1-up Black Friday with Prime Day deals for members only

Thomas Piketty: "Germany is *the* country that has never repaid its debts. It has no standing to lecture..."

Taylor Swift is fighting the wrong part of the music industry (glad someone finally pointed this out)

The Dissolve reviews Pixar's entire catalog of films

Three reasons the American Revolution was a mistake (1. Slavery would have been abolished earlier...)

There's no quick links archive yet. If you'd like to see 'em all, follow @kottke on Twitter.

Young Han Solo movie announcedJUL 07

Disney is proceeding at full steam in delivering more Star Wars to your eyeballs. Today they announced that Christopher Miller and Phil Lord, the duo behind The Lego Movie, will direct a movie about a young Han Solo.

The screenplay is written by Lawrence Kasdan and Jon Kasdan. The story focuses on how young Han Solo became the smuggler, thief, and scoundrel whom Luke Skywalker and Obi-Wan Kenobi first encountered in the cantina at Mos Eisley.

Release date is May 2018. As Princess Leia once said, "Disney, I hope you know what you're doing."

Screen addiction (or why Grandma's sad)JUL 07

Screen Addiction Is Taking a Toll on Children, from Jane Brody in the NY Times:

Parents, grateful for ways to calm disruptive children and keep them from interrupting their own screen activities, seem to be unaware of the potential harm from so much time spent in the virtual world.

In reply, John Hermann writing at The Awl:

The grandparent who is persuaded that screens are not destroying human interaction, but are instead new tools for enabling fresh and flawed and modes of human interaction, is left facing a grimmer reality. Your grandchildren don't look up from their phones because the experiences and friendships they enjoy there seem more interesting than what's in front of them (you). Those experiences, from the outside, seem insultingly lame: text notifications, Emoji, selfies of other bratty little kids you've never met. But they're urgent and real. What's different is that they're also right here, always, even when you thought you had an attentional claim. The moments of social captivity that gave parents power, or that gave grandparents precious access, are now compromised. The TV doesn't turn off. The friends never go home. The grandkids can do the things they really want to be doing whenever they want, even while they're sitting five feet away from grandma, alone, in a moving soundproof pod.

As a writer for screens, someone who spends a tremendous amount of time each day staring at screens, and an involved parent of two grade-schoolers, this is precisely where my professional and personal lives meet, so I've done a bit of thinking about this recently. Here's what I've come up with and am attempting to actually believe:

People on smartphones are not anti-social. They're super-social. Phones allow people to be with the people they love the most all the time, which is the way humans probably used to be, until technology allowed for greater freedom of movement around the globe. People spending time on their phones in the presence of others aren't necessarily rude because rudeness is a social contract about appropriate behavior and, as Hermann points out, social norms can vary widely between age groups. Playing Minecraft all day isn't necessarily a waste of time. The real world and the virtual world each have their own strengths and weaknesses, so it's wise to spend time in both.

Colorado's success in curbing teen pregnanciesJUL 06

Colorado has spent the last six years conducting a real life test to see if they could reduce the number of unwanted pregnancies and abortions. As the NYT's Sabrina Tavernise explains, the results were stunning.

If we want to reduce poverty, one of the simplest, fastest and cheapest things we could do would be to make sure that as few people as possible become parents before they actually want to.

Syndicated from NextDraft. Subscribe today or grab the iOS app.

Fibonacci sequence hidden in ordinary division problemJUL 06

If you divide 1 by 999,999,999,999,999,999,999,998,999,999,999,999,999,999,999,999 (that's 999 quattuordecillion btw), the Fibonacci sequence neatly pops out. MATH FTW!

Fibonacci division

At the end of Carl Sagan's Contact (spoilers!), the aliens give Ellie a hint about something hidden deep in the digits of π. After a long search, a circle made from a sequence of 1s and 0s is found, providing evidence that intelligence was built into the fabric of the Universe. I don't know if this Fibonacci division thing is on quite the same level, but it might bake your noodle if you think about it too hard. (via @stevenstrogatz)

Update: From svat at Hacker News, an explanation of the magic behind the math.

It's actually easier to understand if you work backwards and arrive at the expression yourself, by asking yourself: "If I wanted the number that starts like 0.0...000 0...001 0...001 0...002 0...003 0...005 0...008 ... (with each block being 24 digits long), how would I express that number?"

(thx, taylor)

I can't believe it's not newspaperJUL 06

Randall Rosenthal makes amazingly realistic wooden sculptures of everyday objects like newspapers, legal pads, baseball cards, and kitchen scenes. He carves each of his sculptures out of a single block of wood. So, this is carved entirely out of wood:

Randall Rosenthal wooden sculpture

And so is this:

Randall Rosenthal wooden sculpture

And this too:

Randall Rosenthal wooden sculpture

And here's a look at that last sculpture in progress:

Randall Rosenthal wooden sculpture

(via @pieratt)

Books in the films of Wes AndersonJUL 06

Books loom large in Wes Anderson's movies. Several of his films open with opening books and Fantastic Mr. Fox is based on an actual book. Here's a nicely edited selection of bookish moments from Anderson's films.

In the work of Wes Anderson, books and art in general have a strong connection with memory. The Royal Tenenbaums (2001) begins with a homonymous book, as does Fantastic Mr. Fox (2009). The Grand Budapest Hotel (2014) begins and ends with a book. Moonrise Kingdom (2012) ends with a painting of a place which no longer exists. These movies have a clear message: books preserve stories, for they exist within them and live on through them.

A 1968 computer art contestJUL 06

Computer Art 1968

From the August 1968 issue of Computers and Automation magazine, the results of their Sixth Annual Computer Art Contest (flip to page 8).

Computer Art 1968

Computer Art 1968

It's also worth paging through the rest of the magazine just for the ads.

What was the Venus de Milo doing with her arms?JUL 03

The Venus de Milo's arms are lost to history but that hasn't stopped historians and scholars wondering what exactly she was doing with them when the statue was carved. In order to test out a theory that Venus was spinning thread, Virginia Postrel hired designer and artist Cosmo Wenman to construct a 3D model of Venus de Milo.

Venus De Milo with arms

A guide to Don DeLillo's booksJUL 03

This list ranking Don DeLillo's novels into categories ranging from "Classic" to "Avoid" from 2007 excludes his two most recent novels, but if you have little exposure to the author, it's a good place to start.

White Noise. DeLillo's breakthrough success, arguably still his quintessential masterpiece, and the funniest and most sustained example of his talent. Jack Gladney, professor of Hitler Studies, struggles with information overload, simulated disasters, an "airborne toxic event," the most photographed barn in America, and a drug that neutralizes the fear of death. If you're going to like DeLillo, this is the book that will make it happen.

Confession: aside from attempting to tackle Underworld1 more than 10 years ago, I have not read any DeLillo. I should probably fix that? (via @davidgrann)

  1. I bought my copy of Underworld at a San Francisco used book store at the same time I bought Infinite Jest. Like I said, Underworld didn't do it for me, but reading IJ became an odd sort of turning point in my life.

Saul Bass' best film title design workJUL 03

Saul Bass designed the opening sequences for dozens of films, including North by Northwest, Psycho, West Side Story, and Goodfellas. Here's a look at some of his best work:

(via art of the title)

How people respond to life-changing inventionsJUL 02

Near the end of a piece by Morgan Housel called Innovation Isn't Dead, appears "the typical path of how people respond to life-changing inventions":

1. I've never heard of it.
2. I've heard of it but don't understand it.
3. I understand it, but I don't see how it's useful.
4. I see how it could be fun for rich people, but not me.
5. I use it, but it's just a toy.
6. It's becoming more useful for me.
7. I use it all the time.
8. I could not imagine life without it.
9. Seriously, people lived without it?

That's about right. I can only recall a couple of instances where I've skipped from step 1 to step 8 or 9: when I first used the Web1 and when Jobs introduced the iPhone at MacWorld. Everything else -- Google, HD TV, Twitter, personal computers, streaming music services, wifi, laptops, Instagram, mobile phones -- went through most of the 9 phases. (via @cdixon)

  1. Not the Internet, the Web. I used the Internet before I used the Web (Usenet, FTP, and Gopher mostly) and I never got the "OMG this is going to change everything" vibe I got after using the Web for five minutes.

How Peter Luger chooses their beefJUL 02

Eater's Nick Solares accompanies the proprietor of Peter Luger Steakhouse to one of the few remaining butchers in the Meatpacking District1 to see how she selects meat for the restaurant.

  1. You know, that place with all the fancy shops, night clubs, and garbage people.

Colbert hosting cable access shows in his spare timeJUL 02

Stephen Colbert recently guest hosted Only in Monroe, a public access cable TV talk show based in Monroe, Michigan. His guest? Michigander Marshall Mathers.1

God, he is so good. I might actually have to watch the Late Show this fall. (thx, michelle)

  1. Do I need the "aka Eminem" here?

Older entries »

this is kottke.org

   Front page
   About + contact
   Site archives

You can follow kottke.org on Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr, Feedly, or RSS.

Ad from The Deck

We Work Remotely

 

Enginehosting

Hosting provided EngineHosting