Radiohead and PT Anderson collaborate on DaydreamingMAY 06

Let's not bury the lede here...Radiohead's new album will be out on Sunday, May 8th at 2pm ET. !!!

The video is by Paul Thomas Anderson for Radiohead's second single, Daydreaming (buy direct, listen at Spotify, etc.) Why PT Anderson? Radiohead's Jonny Greenwood did the soundtrack for Anderson's There Will Be Blood.

  quick links, updated constantly

Can you sleep train your baby at 2 months? (A: Yes. We did it 2X. It is my #1 new parent tip.)

101 behind-the-scenes photos from the original Star Wars Trilogy

All The Food That’s Fit To Cook: NY Times to start meal kit delivery service tied to their Cooking site

TED Talks: The Official TED Guide to Public Speaking

SpaceX wants to send a capsule to land on Mars by 2018. @BadAstronomer thinks they can do it.

MyTransHealth is a database of trans friendly healthcare providers

Early entries from the National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year Contest. These are fantastic.

"Despite the prevailing advice, exercise is pretty unhelpful for weight loss"

What is the most expensive object on Earth?

Claude Shannon, father of the information age, turns 100

There's no quick links archive yet. If you'd like to see 'em all, follow @kottke on Twitter.

Some prime numbers are illegal in the United StatesMAY 06

The possession of certain prime numbers is illegal in the US. For instance, one of these primes can be used to break a DVD's copyright encryption.

Beautiful handmade wooden skisMAY 05

Mike Parris worked as a robotics engineer at Carnegie Mellon in the 90s but always harbored a greater interest in skiing. He eventually moved to Jackson Hole, WY to make handmade skis & snowboards full-time. Igneous skis cost $1600 a pair, but they are beautiful and each pair is made especially for how each person skis.

Igneous Skis

Igneous Skis

When I saw the skis in the video, I wondered how a wooden ski would hold up to tough skiing, but it turns out that in addition to the hardwood on the top, Igneous skis use graphite bases, composite fiberglass, and Kevlar as part of the construction.

Ye Olde Medieval Tube MapMAY 05

Medieval Tube Map

Londonist created a map of the London Underground with station names contemporary to medieval London.

The medieval period spans something like 1,000 years, covering the centuries from the Roman withdrawal around 400 AD to the rise of the Tudors in the late 15th century. Place names, of course, changed greatly over this time and those on the map were not necessarily all in use at the same time. Where applicable, we've favoured spellings used in the Domesday survey of 1086. Elsewhere, we've taken the earliest recorded version of a place name.

Rube Goldberg HTML formMAY 05

Form Rube

Ahhh, this makes me nostalgic for the 90s World Wide Web. Designer Sebastian Serena has built a Rube Goldberg machine out of HTML form elements. Once you start, you'll watch the whole thing. (via @Colossal)

How to understand a Picasso paintingMAY 04

It's impossible to tell someone how to interpret paintings by Picasso in only 8 minutes, but Evan Puschak provides a quick and dirty framework for how to begin evaluating the great master's work by considering your first reaction, the content, form, the historical context, and Picasso's own personal context.

Teen born with no fingers is a piano virtuosoMAY 04

Humans are amazing. Alexey Romanov has no fingers, took up music only two years ago, and can play the piano better than 99.9% of world's population. (via the guardian)

Jane Jacobs born 100 years ago todayMAY 04

Jane Jacobs Google Doodle

Jane Jacobs, journalist, activist, and author of The Death and Life of Great American Cities (one of my favorite books of all time), was born 100 years ago today. Curbed has a big collection of stories in celebration and Vox also has an appreciation of her career.

When Jane Jacobs published The Death and Life of Great American Cities in 1961, she was a lone voice with no credentials speaking up against the most powerful ideas in urban planning. Fifty-five years later, on Jacobs' 100th birthday (honored in today's Google Doodle), urban dwellers are all living in her vision of the great American city.

The Death and Life of Great American Cities was a reaction to urban planning movements that wanted to clear entire city blocks and rebuild them. Jacobs argued this ignored everything that made cities great: the mixture of shops, offices, and housing that brought people together to live their lives. And her vision triumphed.

Fun and sorta weird fact: neither The Death and Life of Great American Cities or Robert Caro's The Power Broker (about Jacobs' foe Robert Moses) is available in ebook format.

Update: From an interview with Jacobs included in Jane Jacobs: The Last Interview and Other Conversations:

If I were running a school, I'd have one standing assignment that would begin in the first grade and go on all through school, every week: that each child should bring in something said by an authority -- it could be by the teacher, or something they see in print, but something that they don't agree with -- and refute it.

BTW, I started the audiobook version of The Power Broker today and it is already so good. (via brainpickings)

Lessons from a 747 pilotMAY 04

Mark Vanhoenacker is a pilot for British Airways and also the author of the well-reviewed Skyfaring, a book about the human experience of flight. Vanhoenacker recently shared six things he's learned from being a pilot for the past 15 years.

I came up with the term "place lag" to refer to the way that airliners can essentially teleport us into a moment in a far-off city; getting us there much faster, perhaps, than our own deep sense of place can travel. I could be in a park in London one afternoon, running, or drinking a coffee and chatting to the dog-walkers. Later I'll go to an airport, meet my colleagues, walk into a cockpit, and take off for Cape Town. I'll fly over the Pyrenees and Palma and see the lights of Algiers come on at sunset, then sail over the Sahara and the Sahel. I'll cross the equator, and dawn will come to me as I parallel the Skeleton Coast of Namibia, and finally I'll see Table Mountain in the distance as I descend to the Mother City.

Then, less than an hour after the long-stilled wheels of the 747 were spun back to life by the sun-beaten surface of an African runway, I'll be on a bus heading into Cape Town, sitting in rush hour traffic, on an ordinary morning in which, glancing down through the windshield of a nearby car, I'll see a hand lift a cup of coffee or reach forward to tune the radio. And I'll think: All this would still be going on if I hadn't flown here. And that's equally true of London, and of all the other cities I passed in the long night, that I saw only the lights of. For everyone, and every place, it's the present.

43 years in solitaryMAY 03

Albert Woodfox describes what it feels like to be on the outside after spending 43 years in solitary confinement.

You know, human beings are territorial, they feel more comfortable in areas they are secure. In a cell you have a routine, you pretty much know what is going to happen, when it's going to happen, but in society it's difficult, it's looser. So there are moments when, yeah, I wish I was back in the security of a cell.

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Scientists: climate change isn't a prankMAY 03

Jimmy Kimmel had some scientists on his show recently to tell the American public that anthropogenic climate change is real, that's it's not a prank, and that the scientific community is "not fucking with you" about this. Trigger warning: the first minute of this video features Sarah Palin speaking.

55 generations of sake brewingMAY 03

One of the oldest businesses in the world, Sudo Honke is a sake brewery founded in 1141 and managed by the Sudo family for the past 55 generations.

We've been making sake for at least 870 years.

I love the "at least" bit. You can buy some of their sake online. (BTW, feel free to supply your own "Sudo, pour me a sake" joke.)

Falling through water to a new free diving world recordMAY 03

Yesterday, New Zealand's William Trubridge set a free diving world record in what's called the free immersion apnea discipline. According to the official results, Trubridge dove, without using fins or weights or tanks, to a depth of 124 meters in Dean's Blue Hole in the Bahamas. The video above offers a view of most of the dive, which took 4 minutes and 24 seconds for Trubridge to complete. I don't know a whole lot about the mechanics of free diving, so I was surprised that after a few pulls on the rope to get himself going, it's a free fall to the bottom. Watching him falling motionless through the water like that was eerie.

Update: Thanks to @chriskaschner for the diving physics lesson:

Below ~25m your lungs compress from pressure and you "fall" underwater, no more floating, only way back is to swim/ pull up

Burn the Witch by RadioheadMAY 03

Two days ago, Radiohead withdrew its forces from the internet. Today, they dropped a new video on YouTube. The rest of the new album soon? Please?

Update: It's on Spotify now and available for sale on Radiohead's site and iTunes. Also, I am liking this song a lot.

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