50 best sci-fi films of the 21st century (so far)JUL 27

The Playlist lists their picks for the 50 best sci-fi films of this century. Unlike the list of 50 best animated films I posted the other day, there are many movies on this list I haven't seen or even heard of, so I'm eager to dig in. Here are picks 6-2:

6. Her
5. Mad Max: Fury Road
4. Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind
3. Upstream Color
2. Under the Skin

Good choice for #1 too. I really didn't care for Under the Skin. Nice to see some love for Edge of Tomorrow, Sunshine, Donnie Darko, Primer, and Snowpiercer as well. I would also have included Cloud Atlas, which I know not a lot of other people liked but I loved, and the first Hunger Games movie.

  quick links, updated constantly

"Such a firefly would immediately collapse under its own weight and become a black hole."

Michael Jordan speaks out against police violence against blacks and the killing of police officers

Jerry Seinfeld hosts John Oliver on Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee

Guy Ritchie's, um, King Arthur? (From Warner Bros, of course. Bro.)

It's plausible that Trump is in Putin's pocket b/c of Russia's financial interest in his businesses

The best emulators for old school gaming (Atari 2600, SNES, Game Boy, etc.)

There's no quick links archive yet. If you'd like to see 'em all, follow @kottke on Twitter.

Warm Regards, a new podcast about climate changeJUL 27

Eric Holthaus, the internet's favorite meteorologist, is hosting a new podcast on climate change called Warm Regards (on iTunes). A recent episode is embedded above and here's a bit more about the show, including some info about his co-hosts:

Joining me with co-hosts Andy Revkin, a veteran environment writer for the New York Times who has covered climate change for 30 years, and Jacquelyn Gill, a paleoecologist at the University of Maine who is an actual, real-life climate scientist and flawlessly navigates climate Twitter.

Also, Holthaus recently started a project on Patreon to support his independent journalism on climate change. I'm in for $3/mo...chip in if you enjoy Eric's work and Twitter contributions and wish to see more.1

  1. I wish all of Holthaus' Patreon stuff was public, not just for the people supporting him. I want to fund his current public work and help him create more work that will, hopefully, be disseminated far and wide. The folks that need intelligent writing and podcasting about climate change aren't the people who are going to back him. I know it's difficult to make that pitch to people (i.e. you get what everyone else does whether they pay or not), but I think most people are paying to support Holthaus and his work, not to get members-only stuff.

Jerry's MapJUL 27

Jerrys Map

Since 1963, Jerry Gretzinger has been working on a map of a world that doesn't exist. The map is never finished. In the morning, when Gretzinger draws a card out of the deck that sets his task for the day, sometimes that card says "scan". That means a portion of the map is scanned and archived, and the copy is reworked to "upgrade" that part of the map. And that's not even the half of it...just watch the whole thing to see how the map has evolved over the years.

It now comprises over 3200 individual eight by ten inch panels. Its execution, in acrylic, marker, colored pencil, ink, collage, and inkjet print on heavy paper, is dictated by the interplay between an elaborate set of rules and randomly generated instructions.

Portions of the map have been shown in Florence, Paris, and New York and it'll be shown at an upcoming exhibition in Japan. (But where he really wants to display it is in MoMA's huge atrium.) Prints and original panels are available on Gretzinger's eBay store. (via @lukaskulas)

The heavy metal-ness of languageJUL 27

To determine which words are the most "metal", this data scientist wrote a program to sift through more than 22,000 albums to find the words most frequently used in heavy metal songs compared to their use in standard English. "Burn" is the most metal word, followed by "cries", "veins", "eternity", "breathe", and "beast". The least metal words?

particularly
indicated
secretary
committee
university
relatively
noted
approximately
chairman
employees

If you were to run an analysis on what I've written at kottke.org, I doubt it would be particularly metal. \m/

Amazon's most interesting goodsJUL 26

Amazon Interesting Finds

Amazon has introduced a new feature called Interesting Finds. Like Canopy or Very Goods (or Svpply, RIP), it presents a curated view of Amazon's vast selection. Looks great for finding gifts...wish it had a tab for kids stuff. (I got my 9-yo son a ladder ball set for his recent birthday. Success!)

How the Republican Party went from Lincoln to TrumpJUL 26

Now that Donald Trump's officially the Republican candidate, here's a summary of how a party once led by Abraham Lincoln came to select Mr. Orange as their #1. The Republican Party hasn't been "the party of Lincoln" for many decades now, but I'm sure Abe is spinning particularly rapidly in his grave over his party's latest turn. (As I'm sure Andrew Jackson and Jefferson Davis have been doing as well over the past eight years.)

How to make a tennis ballJUL 26

This is a beautifully shot video of the process for making tennis balls, from what looks like bread dough in the first steps to stamping the logo on the ball right before it goes into the canister.

I was commissioned to make a film and shoot a set of images by ESPN for Wilson, to show the manufacturing process of their tennis balls for the US Open. We flew to the factory, shot the film and stills in one day then flew home. Its an amazingly complex manufacture, requiring 24 different processes to make the final ball. It was hot, loud and the people who worked there, worked fast. So much beauty in each stage. I love the mechanics of how things are made, it fills me with great pleasure.

I love the little hand-clasper bots that put the yellow felt on the balls. One question though: the entire video is shot at normal speed, but the people putting the felt on the balls, that seemed sped up. But maybe they were just moving that fast?

Speaking of, feel free to have many possibly conflicting feelings about the people making the balls and their inevitable future replacement by a fully automated system. I know I did! (thx, damien)

Prettifying graffitiJUL 26

Mathieu Tremblin

Mathieu Tremblin

For a project called Tag Clouds, street artist Mathieu Tremblin paints over graffiti tags and makes them more legible. The result looks like when Word says that the Hardkaze and Aerosol fonts are used in the document you're trying to open but are missing from your computer and you click OK to replace them with whatever's available. I think the font above is Arial, which is perfect. I also like this faux-watermark piece he did:

Mathieu Tremblin

How Prince's iconic symbol was designedJUL 25

Prince Logo

Prince's iconic symbol was originally designed by Martha Kurtz and Dale Hughes (based on an initial concept by Lizz Frey) for use in a 1992 music video and Hughes shared a bunch of the original files and thinking that went into its design.

The day before Prince was scheduled to view HDMG's latest edit of the video, Mitch Monson (HDMG partner/video graphics artist) asked Martha and me if we could create an animated 3D logo to use as a close to the video.... by tomorrow.

Umm, okay, and what do you have to work with?

Well, we have these drawings that Lizz has been working on...

(via do I even need to tell you)

OJ: Made in AmericaJUL 25

OJ Simpson Trial

Last night, I finished OJ: Made in America, ESPN's 8-hour documentary series about OJ Simpson. Prior to starting the series, I would rather have poked an eye out than spend another second of my life thinking about OJ Simpson; I'd gotten my fill back in the 90s. But I'd heard so many good things about it that I gave it a shot. Pretty quickly, you realize this is not just the biography of a man or the story of a trial but is a deep look at racism, policing, and celebrity in the US. OJ: Made in America is excellent and I recommend it unreservedly. From Brian Tallerico's review:

Ezra Edelman's stunningly ambitious, eight-hour documentary is a masterpiece, a refined piece of investigative journalism that places the subject it illuminates into the broader context of the end of the 20th century. You may think you know everything about The Trial of the Century, especially if you watched FX's excellent "The People vs. OJ Simpson: American Crime Story," but "OJ: Made in America" not only fills in details about the case but offers background and commentary that you've never heard before. It is an examination of race, domestic abuse, celebrity, civil rights, the LAPD, the legal process and murder over the last fifty years, using the OJ Simpson story as a way to refract society. Its length may seem daunting, but I would have watched it for another eight hours and will almost certainly watch it again before the summer is over. It's that good.

The only real criticism I have of the series is that the treatment of women in America should have been explored more, on the same level as racism and celebrity. A.O. Scott picked up on this in his NY Times review:

It is hard not to notice the predominance of male voices among the interview subjects, and the narrowness of the film's discussion of domestic violence. This is not to say that the issue is ignored: Mr. Simpson's history of abusing Nicole is extensively and graphically documented, as is the fact that most of his friends ignored what was going on at their Rockingham estate. But the film, which so persuasively treats law enforcement racism as a systemic problem, can't figure out how to treat violence against women with the same kind of rigor or nuance.

A fuller discussion of domestic violence in the US and misogyny in sports would have provided another powerful, reinforcing aspect of the story.

The Complacent ClassJUL 25

Complacent Class

The Complacent Class is a forthcoming book by Tyler Cowen.

Since Alexis de Tocqueville, restlessness has been accepted as a signature American trait. Our willingness to move, take risks, and adapt to change have produced a dynamic economy and a tradition of innovation from Ben Franklin to Steve Jobs.

The problem, according to legendary blogger, economist and bestselling author Tyler Cowen, is that Americans today have broken from this tradition -- we're working harder than ever to avoid change. We're moving residences less, marrying people more like ourselves and choosing our music and our mates based on algorithms that wall us off from anything that might be too new or too different. Match.com matches us in love. Spotify and Pandora match us in music. Facebook matches us to just about everything else.

Of course, this "matching culture" brings tremendous positives: music we like, partners who make us happy, neighbors who want the same things. We're more comfortable. But, according to Cowen, there are significant collateral downsides attending this comfort, among them heightened inequality and segregation and decreased incentives to innovate and create.

Cowen is also releasing another book called Stubborn Attachments: A Vision for a Society of Free, Prosperous, and Responsible Individuals.

In that work, I outline a true and objectively valid case for a free and prosperous society, and consider the importance of economic growth for political philosophy, how and why the political spectrum should be reconfigured, how we should think about existential risk, what is right and wrong in Parfit and Nozick and Singer and effective altruism, how to get around the Arrow Impossibility Theorem, to what extent individual rights can be absolute, how much to discount the future, when redistribution is justified, whether we must be agnostic about the distant future, and most of all why we need to "think big."

It is only available by emailing him that you've pre-ordered The Complacent Class. Oh, and a reminder about how I (try to) read books.

Teaser trailer for Sherlock season 4JUL 25

I really like Sherlock, but a little less so every season...and this trailer seems to point in what I feel is a bad direction. Why does everything have to be so cartoonishly big and important? This isn't James Bond with the entire world under imminent threat every 12 months from some heretofore unknown super-villain who is in charge of a global cabal of baddies that suddenly materialized, fully formed, out of nowhere. To be fair, Sherlock is far from the only show/movie series that does this (and to be more fair, they do it less than most), but the constant raising of the stakes is lazy writing and leads only into a corner.

The two most suspenseful movies I saw last year were Mad Max: Fury Road and Spotlight. Both focused on relatively small actions -- the rescue and survival of five women in the former and the gathering of long hidden truths about the Catholic Church in the latter -- and both were edge-of-your-seat the entire time. And the movie about journalism (journalism!) was actually the more suspenseful of the two, even though I knew the outcome the entire time. That's excellent writing. I know the Sherlock team is capable of excellent writing -- it's one of the most inventive shows out there -- and I hope this season will be more interesting than the OH MY GOD THE WORLD IS ENDING AND ONLY SHERLOCK CAN SAVE US vibe I'm getting from the trailer. TL;DR: the trailer for a TV show is too exciting. (Oh brother.)

Low budget THX intro soundJUL 24

When you put a vacuum cleaner and a harmonica together, you get something that sounds a lot like the THX intro sound. This make me laugh SO HARD. See also the shovel that sounds like the Smells Like Teen Spirit intro.

A year-long time lapse of the Earth rotating in spaceJUL 22

NASA recently released a time lapse video of the Earth constructed from over 3000 still photographs taken over the course of a year. The photos were taken by a camera mounted on the NOAA's DSCOVR satellite, which is perched above the Earth at Lagrange point 1.

Wait, have we talked about Lagrange points yet? Lagrange points are positions in space where the gravity of the Sun and the Earth (or between any two large things) cancel each other out. The Sun and the Earth pull equally on objects at these five points.

L1 is about a million miles from Earth directly between the Sun and Earth and anything that is placed there will hover there relative to the Earth forever (course adjustments for complicated reasons aside). It is the perfect spot for a weather satellite with a cool camera to hang out, taking photos of a never-dark Earth. In addition to DSCOVR, at least five other spacecraft have been positioned at L1.

L2 is about a million miles from the Earth directly opposite L1. The Earth always looks dark from there and it's mostly shielded from solar radiation. Five spacecraft have lived at L2 and several more are planned, including the sequel to the Hubble Space Telescope. Turns out that the shadow of the Earth is a good place to put a telescope.

L3 is opposite the Earth from the Sun, the 6 o'clock to the Earth's high noon. This point is less stable than the other points because the Earth's gravitational influence is very small and other bodies (like Venus) periodically pass near enough to yank whatever's there out, like George Clooney strolling through a country club dining room during date night.

And quoting Wikipedia, "the L4 and L5 points lie at the third corners of the two equilateral triangles in the plane of orbit whose common base is the line between the centers of the [Earth and Sun]". No spacecraft have ever visited these points, but they are home to some interplanetary dust and asteroid 2010 TK7, which orbits around L4. Cool! (via slate)

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