1969 Bell System logo redesign pitch video by Saul BassSEP 04

From 1969, this is the video that Saul Bass made to pitch AT&T on a new corporate identity. What a time capsule. Here's the logo, which remained in use until 1983, when Bass designed the "Death Star" logo to replace it.

Att Logo 1969

  quick links, updated constantly

"I don't think people speak in semicolons."

I had no idea you could make a challenging game out of tic-tac-toe

From the NY Review of Books, one of Oliver Sacks' last published pieces, on the unusual effects of a brain surgery

Most mammals take 21 seconds to pee, regardless of size

"Making something with your own two hands is a super power."

Haven't cried on the subway lately? Here are seven of the most moving podcasts ever recorded.

Noticing is a new blog by Radiolab's Robert Krulwich and Aatish Bhatia

Science isn't broken, it's just a hell of a lot harder than we give it credit for

Millennial formal table setting includes spots for "episode of mad men on laptop" and "other beer"

The mystery of why it’s impossible to pull apart interleaved phone books; hint: it's like a Chinese finger puzzle

There's no quick links archive yet. If you'd like to see 'em all, follow @kottke on Twitter.

Star Wars Episode IV: Laser Moon AwakensSEP 04

The Auralnauts provide an alternate soundtrack and dialogue for Star Wars.

(via @waxpancake)

"This job is so cool because it's about imagination, then destruction."SEP 04

Chris Wondolowski is a striker for the San Jose Earthquakes in MLS. Here's how he goes about his job of putting the ball in the net. Unsurprisingly, 99% of being a striker involves not kicking a football.

A major part of my job is to lie (sorry, Mom). I have to use deception to manipulate two, sometimes three, defenders guarding me. It's a 90-minute game of chess. If I know we don't have the ball in a threatening spot, I'll often sacrifice my positioning for a little while so I can soften up the defenders for later. I want to build up their confidence and make them think they're all over me. For example, I always know the exact spot I want to end up when a play is building in the middle of the field. And if I see that my teammate is running down the wing with the ball, I know he's maybe eight seconds away from crossing the ball into the box. I can't simply run to my spot right away. I need to use about 7.5 seconds before the potential pass comes to confuse the defenders. I need to make them believe that I'm going anywhere else but that spot.

Wondo is also one of a number of athletes who uses visualization before games to prepare himself for success.

Long before the game starts, whether I'm at home at Avaya Stadium or on the road, I'm already on the field starting my work. But I'm not warming up or kicking a ball around; I'm imagining how the whole game will play out in my head. I walk the entire field listening to music, from one goal area to the other. I'm visualizing where the other 21 men could be, how the ball might come to me, and how I can get it past the defenders and the goalie. I might also picture the ball arcing through the air from a corner kick, then me jumping up, making contact with my head and the ball going into the top corner, splashing against the netting before settling in the grass. (It's the little details that make it real.) No matter what, in my head, I'm envisioning myself scoring. Every time, the ball lands perfectly in the back of the net.

The varying wavelengths of colorsSEP 03

Rain Bros

Rain-Bros by Daniel Savage is a fun visualization of the different wavelengths of light in the visible spectrum, from the loping walk of red to blue's energetic bounce.

Hanging in the WoodsSEP 03

[This is NSFW.] Artist Hilde Krohn Huse needed a minute or two of film of herself hanging naked upside down from a tree branch for a project she was working on. But when the rope tightened around her ankle too much, things went a little wrong.

My first thought was, "OK, you've fucked up, Hilde, but let's try to get you out of this so nobody needs to know." I hauled myself up, hand over hand, until I was swinging horizontally, just below the branch, and tried to yank my foot free.

It was hopeless. Righting myself, I put my free foot back on the ground to rest for a moment, then tried again, pulling myself up and fighting, puppet-like, against my bonds. My left foot, taking my weight in the lowest noose, started to spasm and I knew my strength wouldn't hold out. But my pride was still uppermost -- the idea of having to draw the attention of others to my humiliating plight still seemed unthinkable. I was losing strength, but full of adrenaline, my face dragging along the woodland floor, leaving me spitting twigs.

As any good artist would, Huse turned her ordeal into an art piece in the form of the 11 minutes of video shot before her camera shut off:

Making NemoSEP 03

From 2003, a 25-minute documentary (plus a few extras) on how Pixar made Finding Nemo.

How far does Pixar go to get a movie made correctly? Far. For instance, everyone on the Nemo team got certified in scuba diving. (via @drwave)

How a volcanic eruption changed the worldSEP 03

The eruption of Mount Tambora in Indonesia in 1815 was the most powerful volcanic eruption in recorded history. According to Tambora: The Eruption That Changed the World by Gillen D'Arcy Wood, the eruption affected the world's weather for at least three years, inspired artists & writers, triggered famine, contributed to the world's cholera epidemic, and altered economic systems all over the world.

Here, Gillen D'Arcy Wood traces Tambora's global and historical reach: how the volcano's three-year climate change regime initiated the first worldwide cholera pandemic, expanded opium markets in China, and plunged the United States into its first economic depression. Bringing the history of this planetary emergency to life, Tambora sheds light on the fragile interdependence of climate and human societies to offer a cautionary tale about the potential tragic impacts of drastic climate change in our own century.

William Broad reviewed the book recently for the NY Times.

The particles high in the atmosphere also produced spectacular sunsets, as detailed in the famous paintings of J.M.W. Turner, the English landscape pioneer. His vivid red skies, Dr. Wood remarked, "seem like an advertisement for the future of art."

The story also comes alive in local dramas, none more important for literary history than the birth of Frankenstein's monster and the human vampire. That happened on Lake Geneva in Switzerland, where some of the most famous names of English poetry had gone on a summer holiday.

The Tambora eruption must have also unleashed quite a racket, perhaps louder than Krakatoa's loudest sound in the world.

The Danish GirlSEP 02

The Danish Girl is an upcoming film starring Eddie Redmayne as transgender pioneer Lili Elbe, who was one of the first people to undergo gender reassignment surgery. It's based on a novel of the same name which presents a fictionalized account of Elbe's life.

The film may well net Redmayne another Oscar nomination, but I don't know how the transgender community will react. From a quick look on Twitter and the past reception of Oscar-hopeful films dealing with similar issues (see The Imitation Game's portrayal of Alan Turing's sexuality), I'm guessing it may not be so well-received.

Why America Needs a Slavery MuseumSEP 02

The Whitney Plantation in Louisiana is the only US museum and memorial to slavery. The Atlantic has a video about the museum and its founder, John Cummings, who spent 16 years and $8 million of his own money on it.

The Wolfpack, the lost tribe of the Lower East SideSEP 02

The Wolfpack is a documentary that follows the six Angulo brothers, whose father kept them sequestered (along with their sister and mother) inside a four-bedroom apartment on the Lower East Side of Manhattan for fourteen years because he thought the city unsafe, allowing only annual or semi-annual trips outside. The boys' only access to the outside world was through movies, which they recreated in their tiny apartment. The trailer:

With no friends and living on welfare, they feed their curiosity, creativity, and imagination with film, which allows them to escape from their feelings of isolation and loneliness. Everything changes when one of the brothers escapes, and the power dynamics in the house are transformed. The Wolfpack must learn how to integrate into society without disbanding the brotherhood.

They did not mess around when it came to their filmmaking...this is a surprisingly realistic Batman costume made out of cereal boxes and yoga mats:

Wolfpack Batman

The Wolfpack won the Grand Jury Prize at Sundance this year, and the brothers made a few videos to thank the festival for their prize. Here are the Clerks and The Usual Suspects thank yous:

They also filmed a scene from one of their favorite movies of 2014, The Grand Budapest Hotel:

The Wolfpack was out in US theaters earlier this summer and is now on Amazon Instant...I think I'm going to watch this tonight. (via @quinto_quarto)

Serious SeinfeldSEP 02

If you recut the scenes from seasons seven & eight of Seinfeld to emphasize certain aspects of Susan's death-by-envelope, you get a feel-good TV movie about George Costanza, a man who finds triumph in the midst of tragedy.

Her death takes place in the shadow of new life; she's not really dead if we find a way to remember her.

The bicycle gymnastSEP 01

Nicole Frýbortová can do things on a bicycle that will make your eyes pop out of your head, including a no-hands, one-foot, backwards wheelie.

(via @atenni)

Google has a new logoSEP 01

Google Logo 2015

....and it still looks like a middlebrow kids clothing brand logo.

So why are we doing this now? Once upon a time, Google was one destination that you reached from one device: a desktop PC. These days, people interact with Google products across many different platforms, apps and devices-sometimes all in a single day. You expect Google to help you whenever and wherever you need it, whether it's on your mobile phone, TV, watch, the dashboard in your car, and yes, even a desktop!

Today we're introducing a new logo and identity family that reflects this reality and shows you when the Google magic is working for you, even on the tiniest screens. As you'll see, we've taken the Google logo and branding, which were originally built for a single desktop browser page, and updated them for a world of seamless computing across an endless number of devices and different kinds of inputs (such as tap, type and talk).

Update: The design team shares how they came up with the new logo.

Update: When I said that Google's new logo "still looks like a middlebrow kids clothing brand logo", this is pretty much what I meant.

Gymboree Google

Gymboree's identity (1993-2000) vs. Google's new identity (Sep 01, 2015)

(via @buzz)

Mad Max: Fury Road as an ancient Egyptian paintingSEP 01

From illustrator @takumitoxin, a wonderful rendering of the events of Mad Max: Fury Road in the style of an ancient Egyptian painting.

Mad Max Fury Egypt

Fury Road is out on Blu-ray today (and streaming). This movie was the perfect summer entertainment.

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