homeaboutarchives + tagsshopmembership!

kottke.org posts about robots

Ex Machina

posted by Jason Kottke   Oct 30, 2014

The directorial debut of Alex Garland, screenwriter of Sunshine and 28 Days Later, looks interesting.

Ex Machina is an intense psychological thriller, played out in a love triangle between two men and a beautiful robot girl. It explores big ideas about the nature of consciousness, emotion, sexuality, truth and lies.

(via http://devour.com/)

Our robot future: R2-D2 or C-3PO?

posted by Jason Kottke   Oct 16, 2014

Rex Sorgatz wonders what sort of robots we’ll build, R2-D2s or C-3POs.

R2-D2 excels in areas where humans are deficient: deep computation, endurance in extreme conditions, and selfless consciousness. R2-D2 is a computer that compensates for human deficiencies — it shines where humans fail.

C3-PO is the personification of the selfish human — cloying, rules-bound, and despotic. (Don’t forget, C3-PO let Ewoks worship him!) C3-PO is a factotum for human vanity — it engenders the worst human characteristics.

I love the chart he did for the piece, characterizing 3PO’s D&D alignment as lawful evil and his politics as Randian.


posted by Jason Kottke   Aug 22, 2014

Automata is a film directed by Gabe Ibáñez in which robots become sentient and…do something. Not sure what…I hope it’s not revolt and try to take over the world because zzzz… But this movie looks good so here’s hoping.

Jacq Vaucan, an insurance agent of ROC robotics corporation, routinely investigates the case of manipulating a robot. What he discovers will have profound consequences for the future of humanity.

Automata will be available in theaters and VOD on Oct 10. (via devour)

Humans need not apply

posted by Jason Kottke   Aug 15, 2014

This video combines two thoughts to reach an alarming conclusion: “Technology gets better, cheaper, and faster at a rate biology can’t match” + “Economics always wins” = “Automation is inevitable.”

That’s why it’s important to emphasize again this stuff isn’t science fiction. The robots are here right now. There is a terrifying amount of working automation in labs and warehouses that is proof of concept.

We have been through economic revolutions before, but the robot revolution is different.

Horses aren’t unemployed now because they got lazy as a species, they’re unemployable. There’s little work a horse can do that pays for its housing and hay.

And many bright, perfectly capable humans will find themselves the new horse: unemployable through no fault of their own.

(via waxy)

Robots Gone Wild

posted by Jason Kottke   Jul 08, 2014


I’ve had this page of misbehaving robot animated GIFs up in a tab for a few days now and every time it pops up on my screen, I watch all of them and then I laugh. That’s it. Instant fun. The garbage truck is my favorite, but what gets me laughing the most is how exuberantly the ketchup squirting robot sprays its payload onto that hamburger bun.

Micro robots!

posted by Jason Kottke   Apr 21, 2014

SRI International and DARPA are making little tiny robots (some are way smaller than a penny) that can actually manufacture products.

They can move so fast! And that shot of dozens of them moving in a synchronized fashion! Perhaps Skynet will actually manifest itself not as human-sized killing machines but as swarms of trillions of microscopic nanobots, a la this episode of Star Trek:TNG. (via @themexican)

Amazing new robot dances to dubstep

posted by Jason Kottke   Nov 01, 2013

It’s not up on their web site or YouTube yet, but I’m pretty sure this is a prototype of a new dancing robot built by Boston Dynamics, makers of the Big Dog, Cheetah, and Petman robots.

Looks similar to Atlas or Petman, but way more advanced…how did they pack all of the circuitry and power supplies into such a small yet realistic-looking housing? (via devour)

Amazing robot gymnast

posted by Jason Kottke   Oct 24, 2013

I wasn’t expecting a whole lot from this video of a robotic gymnast doing a routine on the high bar, but holy cow! I audibly gasped at the 33-second mark and again at 57 seconds.

Looks like a home-built, just some guy in his garage. The robot has learned some new tricks since that video was made. Here’s a quintuple backflip landing:

A double twist that it didn’t quite land:

And it does floor exercises as well…here’s a double back handspring:

(via @moth)

Robotics state-of-the-art in 2013

posted by Jason Kottke   Oct 22, 2013

At In Focus, Alan Taylor surveys the state-of-the-art in robotics with a varied selection of photos. For example, here are two Big Dogs frolicking in the robot dog park:

Big Dogs Frolic

And better yet, Florian Lopes looks as though he’s enjoying his new bionic hand:

Bionic Hand

The robot that does parkour

posted by Jason Kottke   Jul 25, 2013

Meet RHex. He’s a robot built by researchers at the University of Pennsylvania and he can do parkour.

They just have to get him jumping as high as the Sand Flea and they’ll have something. (via digg)

Robot evolution

posted by Jason Kottke   Apr 15, 2013

Starting with cubes of four simple materials (bone, tissue, 2 types of muscles) and one simple rule (faster bots have more offspring) results in a surprising amount of complexity among walking robots.

(via buzzfeed)

Lionel Messi vs. robot goalkeeper

posted by Jason Kottke   Apr 08, 2013

Someone built a robotic goalkeeper and then someone else had the bright idea to pit reigning best player in the world Lionel Messi against it:

Iker Casillas, your job is in jeopardy. But maybe not quite yet…by the final attempt, Messi seems to have figured out how to send the goalie the wrong way, at least for an instant. (via digg)

LEGO paper airplane folding machine

posted by Aaron Cohen   Mar 21, 2013

It does what it says on the tin.

My favorite part is how it shoots the airplane out at the end. “Be gone, good sir, I am quite done with you!” (thx, Alex)

Cinder block throwing robot

posted by Aaron Cohen   Mar 04, 2013

I don’t want to stand in the way of all science, but I am completely on board with the banning of all research into the creation of a dancing dog robot that throws cinder blocks with ease. Oops, I am too late. And now this is happening.

This place isn’t too far from me in Boston, so if anyone wants to meet up for a little Terminator 2 style future saving, let me know.

Chainsaw-wielding robot

posted by Jason Kottke   Jan 28, 2013

This robot with a chainsaw for an arm makes a few cuts into a log and, voila, chairs.

More info here. What’s so terrifying about furniture making? Now imagine this robot with tiny chainsaws on its arms leading a army of BigDog-mounted noodle-slicing robots and sleep well tonight, suckers! (via @curiousoctopus)

NASA’s Smart SPHERES, floating robot drones on the ISS

posted by Jason Kottke   Jan 14, 2013

NASA is testing something they call SPHERES (Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites) on the International Space Station…they are spherical robots that can fly around the station and perform simple tasks. They were inspired by the floating droid remote that Luke trains with in Star Wars. The most recent test was in December.

The Smart SPHERES, located in the Kibo laboratory module, were remotely operated from the International Space Station’s Mission Control Center at Johnson to demonstrate how a free-flying robot can perform surveys for environmental monitoring, inspection and other routine housekeeping tasks.

In the future, small robots could regularly perform routine maintenance tasks allowing astronauts to spend more time working on science experiments. In the long run, free-flying robots like Smart SPHERES also could be used to inspect the exterior of the space station or future deep-space vehicles.

They are outfitting the Smart SPHERES with Android phones for data collection:

Each SPHERE Satellite is self-contained with power, propulsion, computing and navigation equipment. When Miller’s team first designed the SPHERES, all of their potential uses couldn’t be imagined up front. So, the team built an “expansion port” into each satellite where additional sensors and appendages, such as cameras and wireless power transfer systems, could be added. This is how the Nexus S handset — the SPHERES’ first smartphone upgrade — is going to be attached.

“Because the SPHERES were originally designed for a different purpose, they need some upgrades to become remotely operated robots,” said DW Wheeler, lead engineer in the Intelligent Robotics Group at Ames. “By connecting a smartphone, we can immediately make SPHERES more intelligent. With the smartphone, the SPHERES will have a built-in camera to take pictures and video, sensors to help conduct inspections, a powerful computing unit to make calculations, and a Wi-Fi connection that we will use to transfer data in real-time to the space station and mission control.”

Here’s some video from a past test:

Chinese noodle-making robot

posted by Jason Kottke   Aug 24, 2012

Many of the food robots I’ve featured on the site look like machines. Not so this Chinese noodle -making robot:

Silvery, pulsing eyes…it looks like something out of a Tom Baker-era Doctor Who serial. Fantastic. (via @leesnelgrove)

Robot and Frank: a heist movie with a robot sidekick

posted by Jason Kottke   Jun 28, 2012

Well, this is something…an ex-jewel thief decides to unretire and rob people with help from his robot butler. I had to look this up on IMDB to make sure it wasn’t something from Funny or Die or College Humor.

Best robotic sidekick since Mr. Spock. Now reboot Lethal Weapon with Donald Glover and a robot playing the Mel Gibson role. (Yes, I meant Donald. Danny is clearly too old for that shit.)

The robot that always wins rock/paper/scissors

posted by Jason Kottke   Jun 27, 2012

The trick with the roshambot is that it waits until its opponent has made her choice and then chooses the winning throw in about 1 millisecond. I.e. it cheats.

I wonder what would happen if you put two of these robots against each other? (via @dens)

Cheese flipping robots

posted by Jason Kottke   Jun 14, 2012

In the vast cheese warehouses of Europe, robots are employed to flip the cheeses as they age. Here’s a Gruyere flipper:

Mushroom processing machine

posted by Jason Kottke   Jun 08, 2012

You’re not going to believe me, but this mushroom processing machine is pretty fascinating. There’s lots of deceptively simple engineering to mechanically manipulate the mushrooms…the auto-alignment and size-sorting bits are especially interesting.

Plus there’s a trance soundtrack. See also how crayons are made, the robotic pancake sorter, and the salami sorting robot. (via @kdern)

Low-resolution 3D printing

posted by Jason Kottke   May 21, 2012

Dirk van der Kooij is a designer who uses a low-resoution 3D printer of sorts to print out plastic furniture with plastic recovered from recycled refrigerators.

Images of the finished product are available on his web site as are the chairs themselves, for €840. (via @curiousoctopus)

Look how high this robot can jump!

posted by Jason Kottke   Mar 30, 2012

I followed a link to this video from Twitter. “Oh, a small jumping robot,” I thought, “I bet it hops over a chair or something.” Not even close. Check this out:

Boston Dynamics is at it again…they did the Big Dog and cheetah robots as well. What are the odds that they change their name to Cyberdyne Systems in the next few years? (via @jcn)

Update: I did a quick calculation…if a 6-ft-tall human could jump as high as this robot relative to its height, they could jump 315 feet into the air, high enough to land on the roof of a 30-story building. (If you ignore the scaling issues, that is.)

A day in the life of a warehouse robot

posted by Jason Kottke   Mar 28, 2012

Amazon announced recently that they bought a company named Kiva for $775 million. In cash. Kiva makes robots for fulfillment warehouses, of which Amazon has many. When I heard this news, I was all, robots are cool, but $775 million? But this short video on how the Kiva robots work made me a believer:

Also, pro-tip, it’s pronounced ro-butt. (via ★interesting)

The fastest land robot in the world

posted by Jason Kottke   Mar 06, 2012

Flesh and blood cheetahs are the fastest land animals, capable of traveling at more than 70 mph for shorts periods of time. This robotic cheetah can only do 18 mph but could probably go forever and ever until everything on the Earth has been caught and consumed by its steely jaws.

For reference, Usain Bolt’s average speed over 100 meters is ~23 mph, so at least he’s safe…for a little while. (via ★interesting)

Update: Another team working at MIT has built a robotic cheetah that can leap over obstacles on the run.

No word on how the team working on the robotic cheetah that can rip bloody human flesh from the bone is coming along.

Robot more human than human?

posted by Jason Kottke   Nov 01, 2011

You remember the BigDog robotic prototype constructed by Boston Dynamics? Now they have a human robot that can run, do push-ups, and just generally acts pretty human.

Take this robot, some super-realistic human masks, and a Siri-powered iPhone 4S, and we’re in Terminator territory. (via ★interesting)

Robot rides bicycle

posted by Jason Kottke   Oct 27, 2011

Watch until at least 45 seconds in.

I wanna see three of these riding a team sprint in a tiny velodrome.

The amazing pen-spinning, phone-catching, rope-tying robotic hand

posted by Jason Kottke   Jun 14, 2011

I think I’ve featured this robot on the site before (yep, here it is), but she seems to have acquired some new skills. Throwing the mobile phone into the air and catching it is flat-out unbelievable but I liked the quiet deftness of the hand’s rice tweezing.

See also the universal gripper, the salami sorter, the robot who considers towels, and the pancake sorter. (via ★mouser)

Robot beanbag hand can grip anything

posted by Jason Kottke   Oct 28, 2010

I am unclear on exactly how this works, but it does work amazingly well.

The gripper uses the same phenomenon that makes a vacuum — packed bag of ground coffee so firm; in fact, ground coffee worked very well in the device. But the researchers found a new use for this everyday phenomenon: They placed the elastic bag against a surface and then removed the air from the bag, solidifying the ground coffee inside and forming a tight grip. When air is returned to the bag, the grip relaxes.

(thx, phil)

Salami sorting robot

posted by Jason Kottke   Apr 30, 2010

It’s no secret that I could watch food-sorting robots all day. This salami sorter is no exception:

The good stuff starts around 55 seconds.