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kottke.org posts about Google Books

What Is Digital Humanism?

posted by Tim Carmody   Apr 18, 2017

dolphin and anchor.jpg

In this century, most people use “humanist” to mean something like “atheist, but nice about it.” That’s not what I’m talking about. I’m thinking about Renaissance Humanism, but applied, updated, or translated to digital technology in the 21st century.

In the Renaissance, Humanism is a complicated umbrella term for different, sometimes contradictory intellectual movements. The most consistent attributes in these humanists are these three things:

  1. they were really into old books and manuscripts, the weirder the better;
  2. they tried hard to save and preserve these texts;
  3. they worked hard to disperse these texts and the ideas inside them to as many people as possible.

And once the printing press came along, they were off to the races.

Aldus Manutius might be my favorite humanist who didn’t write very much. He edited and published classical texts in slim, portable, affordable printed volumes, and invented or popularized a bunch of typographical conventions, like italics, commas, and semicolons.

In the metaphor of the all-in-one machine, Humanists were first and foremost scanners. They translated knowledge from one technology, and its attendant modes of thinking, into another. They took old things and made them new.

Planetary - Elijah Saves Things
[From Planetary by Warren Ellis, John Cassaday, and Laura Martin]

All of the genuinely great works of the 21st century have been acts of digital humanism. And of those works, three stand out as the purest and maybe the best, both to me and (in their suggestions) the readers of Kottke.org.

Wikipedia, Google Books, and The Internet Archive. These three projects, imperfect as they are, are the best attempts we’ve made to save what we know and make it available in new forms to as many people as possible.

Here are some other projects that readers mentioned:

Every day, sometimes visibly and sometimes not, people work to save all of the things we’ve built on the web. It’s probably the most massive, audacious, unlikely project in the history of the written word. If we ever do build a time capsule for the internet, we’ll only have anything left to save because someone else worked to save it first.

God fave the Queen!

posted by Jason Kottke   Sep 25, 2013

While researching the etymology of the word “fave”, a noun that’s in the process of being verbed,1 I noticed that, according to Google’s ngram viewer, the word was much more popular in the 1600-1700s than it is now.

fave etymology

A bit of investigation reveals that Google’s book-scanning software is at fault; it can’t recognize the long s commonly used in books prior to the 1800s. So each time it encounters “save” with a long s, it sees “fave”:

Fave Us

Fave Us 02

Fave Us 03

Fave Us 04

  1. “Fave” (n., adj.) is slang for “favorite”, a usage that started in the US in the 1920s, as in “Teddy Roosevelt was totally my fave President”. Recently, “fave” (v.) has come to mean liking or marking an item as a favorite on social media services like Twitter, Flickr, Facebook, Tumblr, Stellar, etc. (IMPORTANT: It’s “fave”, not “fav”. Let’s get this one right, people.)

Spy magazine on Google Books

posted by Jason Kottke   Feb 17, 2011

Google has put every issue of the influential Spy magazine up on Google Books to read for free. (via kbandersen)

Google’s page turners

posted by Jason Kottke   Oct 20, 2009

This is page 471 of The Anglo-American Telegraphic Code book (previously mentioned here).

Google Books Fingers

Looks like the scanner caught one of Google’s pink-fingered elves at work. A quick search reveals several other such errors.