Crafted by Morgan Spurlock  JUN 19 2015

Crafted is a 25-minute documentary from Morgan Spurlock about artisanship in the contemporary age, profiling knife makers, potters, and restaurateurs who still do things more or less manually. A trailer:

The documentary was created to explore the mindset of today's artisan and determine how artisanship has evolved along with -- or, at times, in spite of -- new technologies that allow instantaneous sharing of knowledge and sourcing of ingredients. Brave creators are breaking from the norm and returning to their roots to master age-old art forms that are more relevant than ever in today's world.

I have often joked about what I do here at kottke.org as being artisanal or handcrafted. (Free range links! Ha!) But watching the trailer the other day, I realized that maybe it's not so much of a joke. Compared to the industrialized information factories of Buzzfeed, Facebook, and Twitter (or even the NY Times or Gawker), what I do is handcrafted. There's no assembly line. I read a bunch of stuff and then write about just a few relevant things. It's inefficient as hell, but most of the time, it results in a good product. (I hope!) In the site's best moments, it really does feel, to me, like I'm treating people "like they're in my house" rather than just pumping out content widgets.

The moment in the trailer that particularly resonated with me was the discussion of risk.

A single injury can have far-reaching consequences. If I injure my hands, I can't feed my family.

I worried we'd be forced to quit from bankruptcy.

"If I injure my hands, I can't feed my family"; I don't handcraft knives, but that applies to me as well. If my wrists go, goodbye computer time. And I've been thinking a lot about how sustainable my business is in the age of industrialized content...my job seems a lot riskier to me than it did just a couple of years ago. But there's still room in the world for handcrafted knives and food in a world of Henckels and McDonald's, so maybe it's possible for a small handcrafted information service like kottke.org to survive and even thrive in the age of Facebook and Buzzfeed. (via @mathowie)

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