The return of the remaindered links (sort of)  JAN 20 2015

I've started posting more links to the @kottke Twitter account and including them on the front page of the site (pinned to the second post on the page). Read on for an explanation of why and where this is (maybe) going.

More than 12 years ago, before kottke.org became my full-time job, I made 2-3 posts per day. Maaaybe up to 5 on a good day. For whatever reason, in December of 2002 I started posting a bunch of links to the site every day. Like 10-12 per day...sometimes up to 20.1 The next month, I stuck that link blog in the sidebar of the site and called them "remaindered links". I kept at it, posting a few things to the main blog each week and dozens of remaindered links every week. Eventually, I pulled the remaindered links out of the sidebar and into the main column. The link descriptions became longer, I started pulling short quotes from the articles I was linking to, and eventually, these links became full-fledged posts. These remaindered links, these leftovers, they are kottke.org now.

The links gave the site a velocity it didn't previously have. I hadn't really thought about it until I sat down to write this post, but that increase in velocity made it possible, more than two years later, for me to quit my job and do kottke.org full-time. But the web has changed. Sites like Reddit, Digg, and Hacker News and services like Facebook and Twitter are so much faster than this one man band...trying to keep pace is like racing an F1 car on roller skates. So, I've traded that velocity for quality (or, if you'd prefer, fussiness). I no longer post 10-12 things per day. Instead I post 4-6 of the most interesting things I can share with you on that given day.2 That means there's a ton of very interesting but not-quite-right-for-whatever-reason stuff that I see but don't have time to share. And that's been frustrating me lately.

So, I've begun posting those extra links, those remainders, to the @kottke Twitter account. Then I pull those links in from Twitter and publish them to the front page of kottke.org. There's no permanent archive, I might stop at any time, they're not gonna show up in RSS, on Facebook, or on Tumblr, and there are no plans beyond what I've already done. I wanted to start with the simplest possible thing and see if it sticks or goes anywhere.

I do have a few ideas on where it could go, however. As my remaindered links experience shows, going fast without a plan can be beneficial in unexpected ways. With different tools and media delivery channels available to me now, I wonder: how fast can a one-person site go while still maintaining that choosiness? Using those new tools, 13 people built Instagram into a $1 billion company with millions of users. I'm not after billions, but I'd settle for making kottke.org sustainable in the future and not having to get a regular job again.

Anyway, your thoughts, questions, and feedback are always welcome.

  1. I went to a conference once and posted 50-60 things a day. It nearly killed me. Now everyone routinely does this on Twitter. Tools matter.

  2. I mean, interestingness is not the only criteria, but it's probably the most important one.

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