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kottke.org posts about pollution

Polluted Water Popsicles

posted by Jason Kottke   Aug 25, 2020

Polluted Water Popsicles

Three art students, Hung I-chen, Guo Yi-hui, and Cheng Yu-ti, collected polluted water from all over Taiwan and turned them into popsicles.

Hung and her teammates visited 100 locations across Taiwan to collect waste. They then placed the samples — complete with dirt, bugs, and trash — into a freezer, turning them into popsicles. In order to preserve them, they encased the popsicles in a polyester resin.

Hung tells Quartz she hopes the project will raise awareness about water pollution. Her team chose to use popsicles as a motif because they are translucent and because popsicles typically look appealing to the eye. “Such pretty popsicles, would you still want to eat them?” she asks.

The same group did a similar polluted soap project for Hong Kong. (thx, naomi)

Chalk one up for environmental pollutants.

posted by Deron Bauman   Mar 04, 2008

Chalk one up for environmental pollutants.

Male starlings with the highest levels of endocrine disruptors in their bodies also possessed unusually developed high vocal centers, an area of the brain associated with songbirds’ songs.

Accordingly, the polluted male starlings sang songs of exceptional length and complexity — a birdsign of reproductive fitness.

Money quote: “Female starlings preferred their songs to those of unexposed males, suggesting that the polluted birds could have a reproductive advantage, eventually spreading their genes through starling populations.”

Photos of the absurdly polluted Citarum River

posted by Jason Kottke   Jun 06, 2007

Photos of the absurdly polluted Citarum River in Indonesia. “Their occupants no longer try to fish. It is more profitable to forage for rubbish they can salvage and trade — plastic bottles, broken chair legs, rubber gloves — risking disease for one or two pounds a week if they are lucky.”

Malcolm Gladwell on “power law problems” like

posted by Jason Kottke   Feb 07, 2006

Malcolm Gladwell on “power law problems” like homelessness, auto pollution, and bad cops. These problems have solutions which focus on the small number of hard-core cases, like the 5% of Denver vehicles that account for 55% of the city’s automobile pollution.