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Massive Military Spending “A Theft From Those Who Hunger”

In 1953, shortly after taking office and Joseph Stalin’s death, President Dwight Eisenhower gave a speech to the American Society of Newspaper Editors that has come to be known as the Chance for Peace speech.

Every gun that is made, every warship launched, every rocket fired signifies, in the final sense, a theft from those who hunger and are not fed, those who are cold and are not clothed. This world in arms is not spending money alone.

It is spending the sweat of its laborers, the genius of its scientists, the hopes of its children.

The cost of one modern heavy bomber is this: a modern brick school in more than 30 cities.

It is two electric power plants, each serving a town of 60,000 population.

It is two fine, fully equipped hospitals. It is some 50 miles of concrete highway.

We pay for a single fighter plane with a half million bushels of wheat.

We pay for a single destroyer with new homes that could have housed more than 8,000 people.

This, I repeat, is the best way of life to be found on the road the world has been taking.

This is not a way of life at all, in any true sense. Under the cloud of threatening war, it is humanity hanging from a cross of iron.

Some 70 years later, the theft not only continues but has been outsourced around the world and into our communities. (via clayton cubitt)

Discussion  2 comments

Paolo Palombo

I did not know about this speech. Couldn't agree more.

James Bachhuber

Ike is so complicated. He has speeches like this and warned about the military industrial complex, but while he was president the Dulles brothers ran a covert world war through the CIA. Shades of gray, I suppose.

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