kottke.org posts about Adam Wilson

Louis C.K. and the Rise of the Laptop LonersOct 26 2012

Writing for the Los Angeles Review of Books, Adam Wilson has a thoughtful take on Louis C.K., his TV show, and his comedy style in general.

The format of the American sitcom held steady for almost 40 years. The most noteworthy innovation was a negation; in the early nineties, HBO comedies like the short-lived Dream On ditched the pervasive canned laugh track, paving the way for the so-called cringe comedy of shows like Curb Your Enthusiasm. On Curb, the absence of a laugh track makes it difficult for viewers to know when to laugh. We cringe because we're holding in laughter, waiting for a cue that it's okay to release. But there is always a breaking point, an explosion into an absurdity so deep -- Larry rushing into the water to "save" a baptismal candidate from drowning, for example -- that the tension is relieved, and the laughter is released.

Louie both reacts to the failure of Lucky Louie and advances on Curb's cringe comedy by creating something tenser, more tonally ambiguous. Louie's singularity lies in its ability to further confound viewers by setting up jokes, and then providing pathos instead of punch lines. Not only does Louie's audience not know when to laugh, they don't even know if what they're watching is supposed to be funny. For the Laptop Loner, this ambiguity is made all the more palpable by the absence of viewing partners; we use other people's reactions to gauge the correctness of our own. But it also makes the ambiguity less assaulting. Alone, we can be comfortable in our discomfort.

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