Entries for October 2012 (November 2012 »    December 2012 »    January 2013 »    Archives)

 

Behind the scenes photos of Raiders of the Lost ArkAARON COHEN  ·  OCT 31

Here's a big collection of behind the scenes photos of the filming of Raiders of the Lost Ark. Including George Lucas and Steven Spielberg looking rad.

george-lucas-steven-spielberg-looking-rad.jpg

And this scene, which scarred me for several years.

face-melting.jpg

Disney bought Star WarsOCT 31

I've been offline for two days and Aaron already posted this (and had the information relayed to me via land line into my power-less house) but this is just too, like, wow to pass up. Disney is buying Lucasfilm for $4 billion.

Under the deal, Disney will acquire ownership of Lucasfilm, a leader in entertainment, innovation and technology, including its massively popular and "evergreen" Star Wars franchise and its operating businesses in live action film production, consumer products, animation, visual effects, and audio post production. Disney will also acquire the substantial portfolio of cutting-edge entertainment technologies that have kept audiences enthralled for many years. Lucasfilm, headquartered in San Francisco, operates under the names Lucasfilm Ltd., LucasArts, Industrial Light & Magic, and Skywalker Sound, and the present intent is for Lucasfilm employees to remain in their current locations.

And they're gonna release a 7th Star Wars film:

Ms. Kennedy will serve as executive producer on new Star Wars feature films, with George Lucas serving as creative consultant. Star Wars Episode 7 is targeted for release in 2015, with more feature films expected to continue the Star Wars saga and grow the franchise well into the future.

Crazy. A non-Lucas non-prequel Star Wars film will hopefully be pretty great, but the purchase price is puzzling. Only $4 billion?

Hurricane Sandy aftermath part twoAARON COHEN  ·  OCT 31

Jason is still without power, but he and family are doing fine.

JFK and Newark are open, but jammed.

ConEd is saying Manhattanites without power will get it back within 3 days. Interactive map of the outages. Long Island could be longer. ConEd map here.

Some subway service should return Thursday, likely north of Midtown. Transit updates here.

With people returning to work, traffic is bad. As power returns, more people going back to work, could make the traffic worse.

NYTimes has a good summary of the storm damage along the East Coast.

AP photo of what's left of Breezy Point after the fire Monday night.

breezy-point-fire.jpg

Collection of Sandy photos from the Boston Globe.

Video of storm from birth to landfall.

Hurricane Sandy aftermathAARON COHEN  ·  OCT 30

(Jason and family are fine, but without power, unsure of when it will come back. Aaron will be updating this throughout the day.)

Hurricane Sandy went through New York City yesterday causing massive flooding and power loss all over the city. While expectations for the storm had ranged across the spectrum, most observers seemed to be caught off guard at the amount of destruction. Here is the Kottke.org Hurricane Sandy link from yesterday and the one from the day before.

Updated Wed 12:15am ET:

22 deaths reported in New York City, 40 total in eight states combined. Several dozen more in Haiti and the Caribbean. This in the NYTimes, talks about two of NYC's fatalities.

Sunday's NYC Marathon will go on.

If you're still without power, it could be 4-5 days before it comes back. And it's not looking great for the subway, either.

Really old skeleton unearthed by fallen tree in New Haven.

David reminded us about how oysters might be able to help with future flooding (and did in the past).

I asked my friend Kevin for a few words on how a new New Yorker rode out the storm.

During the worst of the storm, around 9 p.m., I was huddled in my bed watching Homeland on my laptop, scanning Thought Catalog's surprisingly good Hurricane Sandy Liveblog, and checking Twitter, which was probably in the finest form I've seen it in a long time: a terrific balance of helpful updates, links, GIFs, and personal communication. Even misinformation, which spreads like wildfire via retweet, was quickly debunked, like CNN's report that the NYSE was under three feet of water. My one disappointment was Twitter's fake satirical accounts, which were mostly uninspired, with the bold exceptions of @ElBloombito and @RomneyStormTips (which was mysteriously shut down).

Finally, a rainbow by Noah Kalina.

noah-kalina-rainbow.jpg

Updated Tues 5:15pm ET:

This might be a dark cloud for many New Yorkers still digging out. Disney has purchased Lucasfilm and plans to release a new Star Wars feature film every 2-3 years. Star Wars 7 comes out in 2015. This information is being delivered to Jason by land line telephone, like in the old days.

A list of open New York City restaurants.

Sea level will be at Sandy levels normally by 2200.

Phenomenal illustration of the effect of last night's power outage on the NYC skyline.

I've not been able to find much information about the impact the storm damage in NJ, NYC, CT, and DE will have on the election. Not on the politics of it, which have been interesting, but will people actually be able to vote? I just heard a radio report on All Things Considered that officials in NJ and CT, at least, are assessing the issue now and considering all options such as loosening absentee ballot rules, paper ballots, generators in voting locations, etc. While states have the responsibility of managing the elections, the date of the election is mandated by the Constitution as "the first Tuesday after the first Monday in November." It's unclear whether states have the power to move this date, but preventing citizens from having to vote after most of the votes in the country have been cast is the priority at this point.

A fantastic infographic of storm info/damage from NYTimes.

Updated Tues 2:00pm ET:

Up here in Boston, things seem to be OK. My neighborhood experienced high winds and whipping rain, but fairly low damage. My street, which floods once or twice a year in heavy rain, was fine. There are reports of branches and trees downing power lines around Cambridge, Somerville, Boston, etc, but most friends that lost power got it back after a relatively short period.

New York death toll updated to 15, 10 in the city.

Buses should be up and running by 5PM, on a Sunday schedule, and will be free today and tomorrow.

All of Jersey City and Newark are without power.

New York City specific 'how to help' link.

NBC's Brian Thompson got a pic of the roller coaster at Seaside Heights in New Jersey in the ocean. (via theatlanticwire)

Roller-coaster.jpg

AP photo of cabs underwater in Hoboken. (via theatlanticwire)

Cabs-under-water.jpg

Tappan Zee Bridge, East River Bridges, RFK Bridge, Lincoln Tunnel open
.

JFK should open tomorrow. Laguardia has runways underwater and may take a little longer.

Matt Stopera is walking around providing pretty remarkable photos of other damage in his Twitter stream. Like this one, this one, and this one.

I can't believe these 'boats on shore pictures'. 1. 2.

Watch this transformer explode in Queens.

As of now, there are 9 reported storm-related fatalities in New York. Across the East Coast, the number is reported to be 14 total.

Mayor Bloomberg spoke earlier this morning to update the city. "This was a devastating storm. Maybe the worst that we have ever experienced." (This video seems wonky, you might have to scroll forward to get it started.)

All of the MTA tunnels under the rivers flooded, and, "There is currently no timetable" for when the subway will be up and running again.

As of last night, seven subway tunnels under the East River flooded. Metro-North Railroad lost power from 59th Street to Croton-Harmon on the Hudson Line and to New Haven on the New Haven Line. The Long Island Rail Road evacuated its West Side Yards and suffered flooding in one East River tunnel. The Hugh L. Carey Tunnel is flooded from end to end and the Queens Midtown Tunnel also took on water and was closed. Six bus garages were disabled by high water. We are assessing the extent of the damage and beginning the process of recovery. Our employees have shown remarkable dedication over the past few days, and I thank them on behalf of every New Yorker. In 108 years, our employees have never faced a challenge like the one that confronts us now. All of us at the MTA are committed to restoring the system as quickly as we can to help bring New York back to normal.

MTA's photo stream shows damage in the stations.

The back up generator at NYU Hospital failed last night forcing hospital staff, firefighters, and EMTs to carry patients down flights of stairs as they were evacuated to other hospitals.

There was an enormous 6 alarm fire in the Breezy Point area of Queens, destroying at least 50 homes. 200 firefighters fought chest-high water to battle the fire and rescue residents. An image of the destruction.

Along with hundreds of thousands of New Yorkers, Gizmodo, Gawker, Daily Kos, and Buzzfeed were among many websites which went down after their data-centers in lower Manhattan lost power.

Letterman and Fallon did their shows without audiences last night.

Crazy video of a ConEd plant exploding on E14 and FDR.

Video of flooding at East 8th and Avenue C, especially spooky because the power suddenly goes out at the :40 second mark. (via Gawker)

Almost 6,000 flights were canceled today.

Hurricane Sandy is (almost) hereOCT 29

It's about 1:30 pm here in NYC and we're starting to see the effects of Hurricane Sandy. Rivers are overflowing their banks, wind is whipping, and residents are either hunkered down or scurrying around picking up last minute supplies. I'll be updating this post when I can, here and there, during the course of the day.

Updated Mon 7:42pm ET:

Kids are way worse than the hurricane today. FEMA, NYPD, FDNY, need emergency parental evac now!

What to Expect at Landfall in Next Two Hours (WSJ):

The storm's quicker-than-expected forward motion means it will make landfall about two hours sooner than previously anticipated. Landfall is now expected around 6 p.m. this evening, near or just south of Atlantic City, N.J. This doesn't change the forecast much for coastal New Jersey, but it could greatly complicate coastal flooding projections for New York Harbor.

Whoa, it looks like the situation in the Brooklyn subway is getting dire:

Flooded Subway

Twitter has compiled a list of hurricane resources on Twitter.

Here's a close-up photo of that crane that's dangling from that building on 57th Street. CBS has a live view of the crane.

Not from The Onion, but this report on how Williamsburg residents are coping with the storm sure reads like it:

"I just got these kick-ass new stereo speakers and I am going to listen to those until the power runs out," Jim Butler, another Edge resident, said, tugging on the doors of the CVS that is part of the complex-it had just closed a few minutes before 5 p.m. "Then I'm going to read and look at my art books. I'll live by candlelight, get in touch with my 19th century self."

From just now on the TV: Con Ed has taken down the Bowling Green and Fulton electrical networks in lower Manhattan. Likely area hit is "east of Broadway btwn Wall St & tip of Manhattan & from Frankfort to Wall btwn William St & East river."

Water level at the Battery has hit 11.25 ft, breaking a record set in 1821.

Updated Mon 4:08pm ET:

Tweet from Jen Bekman:

[Con Ed] rep on NY1 sayspower shutdown "very likely" south of 34th st. 7-9pm for high tide.

Some common sense tips: how to make your cell phone charge last if the power goes out.

Walked by Joseph Leonard on Waverly Place here in the West Village earlier and it was jam packed.

Want to look at a bunch of good photos of the hurricane? Alan Taylor at In Focus has you covered.

Great story of how Dan Rather hacked up the first radar image of a hurricane shown on TV for Hurricane Carla in 1961.

He took a camera crew to the U.S. Weather Bureau (now the National Weather Service) office in downtown Galveston, which featured a cutting-edge WSR-57 radar console. He convinced the bureau staff to let him broadcast, live, from the office. He asked a Weather Bureau meteorologist to draw him a rough outline of the Gulf of Mexico on a transparent sheet of plastic; during the broadcast, he held that drawing over the computer's black-and-white radar display to give his audience a sense both of Carla's size and of the location of the storm's eye. As CBS plugged into the broadcast, that audience suddenly became a national one.

Tappan Zee Bridge closed as of 4pm. And all bridges/tunnels in and out of Manhattan are closing at 7pm...or so I've heard on TV/Twitter. Is that right? Has anyone seen the Batman?

Things aren't looking good on Nantucket. And probably not even close to max storm surge.

Updated Mon 3:47pm ET:

There are reports of a crane collapse at One World Trade but Jake Dobkin doesn't see any evidence of that. (Update: Jake was right...no crane issue at 1WTC.)

Updated Mon 3:11pm ET:

More footage of the 1938 hurricane that hit the northeastern US.

Updated Mon 3:07pm ET:

Is TV news and Twitter whipping everyone into a hurricane-like froth with its incessant coverage of Sandy? Well, E.B. White has similar complaints about radio and Hurricane Edna back in 1954.

The radio either lets Nature alone or gives her the full treatment, as it did at the approach of the hurricane called Edna. The idea, of course, is that the radio shall perform a public service by warning people of a storm that might prove fatal; and this the radio certainly does. But another effect of the radio is to work people up to an incredible state of alarm many hours in advance of the blow, while they are still fanned by the mildest zephyrs.

That awesome photo you saw of Hurricane Sandy? It might not be Hurricane Sandy.

Vintage newsreel footage of hurricanes in 1938, 1955, and 1969.

Piers Morgan spotted a crane that has buckled on a building near CNN HQ in NYC (157 West 57th):

Crane in hurricane

Massive bang and this giant skyscraper crane outside my office just buckled... Scary.

Updated Mon 2:19pm ET:

Lots of people have noted this feed of hurricane-related photos on Instagram.

NYC mayor Michael Bloomberg urges residents to "Have a sandwich out of the fridge. Sit back, and watch the television." I am so there, Mr. Mayor.

The lower level of FDR Drive on the east side of Manhattan is underwater:

FDR flood

The storm surge in New York Harbor is getting serious.

Con Ed just called us saying that they might have to shut off our power. No timeline mentioned.

Climate change has not been an issue at all in the 2012 Presidential election. Elizabeth Kolbert says that's "grotesque".

BTW, Mitt Romney wants to shut down FEMA and have the states fend for themselves. United(?) States of America?

Earlier:

This WSJ comparison of 2011's Hurricane Irene and Sandy really captures just how massive this storm is and why people seem more concerned about it than they were with Irene.

Via Jeff Masters, Sandy is already producing record storm surges:

The National Weather Service in Atlantic City, NJ said that isolated record storm surge flooding already occurred along portions of the New Jersey coast with this morning's 7:30 am EDT high tide cycle. As the tide goes out late this morning and this afternoon, water levels will fall, since the difference in water levels between low tide and high tide is about 5'. However, this evening, as the core of Sandy moves ashore, the storm will carry with it a gigantic bulge of water that will raise waters levels to the highest storm tides ever seen in over a century of record keeping, along much of the coastline of New Jersey and New York. The peak danger will be between 7 pm - 10 pm, when storm surge rides in on top of the high tide. The full moon is today, which means astronomical high tide will be about 5% higher than the average high tide for the month, adding another 2 - 3" to water levels.

The Holland Tunnel and the Brooklyn Battery Tunnel will be closing at 2pm today.

The swans are leaving Sheepshead Bay in Brooklyn:

Swan Hurricane Evac

Here's a satellite view of Sandy developing near the equator and building in strength as it churns through the Caribbean and up the Atlantic coast:

Here's my post from yesterday with all sorts of hurricane resources, including Jeff Master's WunderBlog, the Wind Map, and check out your flood zone in NYC.

Hurricane Sandy comin'OCT 28

I don't know how much I'm going to be updating this, but here's a few things about the hurricane that's bearing down on the East Coast right now. Mostly NYC centric.

Updated Sun 11:52pm ET:

The main hall of the closed Grand Central Terminal, deserted. Even stranger, the busiest subway station in NYC (Times Square), closed and deserted.

Times Square Closed

The Wind Map will likely be interesting over the next 36-48 hours. (via @panicstreak)

From Jeff Masters' WunderBlog, a more technical view of the storm:

The National Weather Service in Upton, New York mentioned today that the predicted maximum water level of 11.7 feet at The Battery in New York City, which is expected to occur at 8:13pm ET on Monday, would break the record of 10.5 feet which was set on September 15, 1960 in Hurricane Donna.

The storm's barometric pressure is going to be historically low:

Sandy should have sustained winds at hurricane force, 75 - 80 mph, at landfall. Sandy's central pressure is expected to drop from its current 953 mb to 945 - 950 mb at landfall Monday night. A pressure this low is extremely rare; according to wunderground weather historian Christopher C. Burt, the lowest pressure ever measured anywhere in the U.S. north of Cape Hatteras, NC, is 946 mb (27.94") measured at the Bellport Coast Guard Station on Long Island, NY on September 21, 1938 during the great "Long Island Express" hurricane.

Masters says that part of the NYC subway system may flood:

The full moon is on Monday, which means astronomical high tide will be about 5% higher than the average high tide for the month. This will add another 2 - 3" to water levels. Fortunately, Sandy is now predicted to make a fairly rapid approach to the coast, meaning that the peak storm surge will not affect the coast for multiple high tide cycles. Sandy's storm surge will be capable of overtopping the flood walls in Manhattan, which are only five feet above mean sea level. On August 28, 2011, Tropical Storm Irene brought a storm surge of 4.13' and a storm tide of 9.5' above MLLW to Battery Park on the south side of Manhattan. The waters poured over the flood walls into Lower Manhattan, but came 8 - 12" shy of being able to flood the New York City subway system. According to the latest storm surge forecast for NYC from NHC, Sandy's storm surge is expected to be at least a foot higher than Irene's. If the peak surge arrives near Monday evening's high tide at 9 pm EDT, a portion of New York City's subway system could flood, resulting in billions of dollars in damage. I give a 50% chance that Sandy's storm surge will end up flooding a portion of the New York City subway system.

But Linsey Lohan urges you not to panic:

WHY is everyone in SUCH a panic about hurricane (i'm calling it Sally)..? Stop projecting negativity! Think positive and pray for peace.

US financial markets were supposed to be open tomorrow but officials now have closed the markets on Monday.

Updated Sun 8:54pm ET:

The Day After Tomorrow, a movie directed by Roland Emmerich in which a super storm hits Manhattan, is available for streaming ($2.99) or to buy ($9.99) on Amazon Instant Video and on iTunes for sale ($12.99).

John Seabrook notes on Twitter:

Full moon at 7.50pm tomorrow, ten minutes before the high point of storm surge. Seems kind of biblical...

Or Mayan. 2012, y'all.

Justin reminds me of a classic New Yorker piece by Joe Morgenstern about a NYC skyscraper that was unprepared for hurricane-force winds.

On a warm June day in 1978, William J. LeMessurier, one of the nation's leading structural engineers, received a phone call at his headquarters, in Cambridge, Massachusetts, from an engineering student in New Jersey. The young man, whose name has been lost in the swirl of subsequent events, said that his professor had assigned him to write a paper on the Citicorp tower, the slash-topped silver skyscraper that had become, on its completion in Manhattan the year before, the seventh-tallest building in the world.

LeMessurier found the subject hard to resist, even though the call caught him in the middle of a meeting. As a structural consultant to the architect Hugh Stubbins, Jr., he had designed the twenty-five-thousand-ton steel skeleton beneath the tower's sleek aluminum skin. And, in a field where architects usually get all the credit, the engineer, then fifty-two, had won his own share of praise for the tower's technical elegance and singular grace; indeed, earlier that year he had been elected to the National Academy of Engineering, the highest honor his profession bestows. Excusing himself from the meeting, LeMessurier asked his caller how he could help.

The student wondered about the columns--there are four--that held the building up. According to his professor, LeMessurier had put them in the wrong place.

"I was very nice to this young man," LeMessurier recalls. "But I said, 'Listen, I want you to tell your teacher that he doesn't know what the hell he's talking about, because he doesn't know the problem that had to be solved.' I promised to call back after my meeting and explain the whole thing."

Updated Sun 8:22pm ET:

From the excellent coverage at WSJ:

Those living above the 10th floor in skyscrapers may want to find shelter in lower floors. Winds increase with height in a hurricane and could be significantly stronger than on ground level. Be cautious about sleeping near a window on Monday night. Do not walk outside on Monday evening, as there could be significant amounts of airborne debris flying around. Rain totals 4-8 inches.

Not a sight you see that often: Grand Central is closed.

Grand Central Closed

From Quartz, a list of webcams to watch as Sandy approaches.

Updated Sun 8:11pm ET:

BREAKING NEWS! [siren] Powerful Storm Brings Down NY Times Paywall: "The Times is providing free unlimited access to storm coverage on nytimes.com and its mobile apps."

From When There's a Flood: if you're preparing your house for a flood, shut off the water, propane, and electricity.

Just checked Uber in the West Village...about 10 cars less than three minutes away. Usually a lot less inventory than that.

Was rumored that MoMA would be open tomorrow with skeleton crew but word just now from their Twitter account: closed tomorrow.

From the NY Times:

If the surge runs as high as forecast, Con Ed will shut off two electrical networks in Lower Manhattan, known as the Fulton and Beekman networks, the official said.

I looked all over the place for a map that showed which parts of the city are served by the Fulton and Beekman but couldn't find anything. I'm assuming the Fulton station is near the World Trade Center and the Beekman is on Beekman St by Pace University. So way Lower Manhattan?

Earlier:

Subway, bus and railroad services in New York and New Jersey are being shut down starting at 7pm tonight. Probably won't be back open until sometime on Wednesday.

NYC schools are closed on Monday. And probably Tuesday. And if public transit is closed on Wed, schools with probably be closed that day too.

Taping your windows to protect them from hurricanes is "a waste of effort, time, and tape".

Residents in Zone A in NYC have been ordered to evacuate. Check out where your zone is here.

New York City's Hurricane brochure is available here.

The tracking map on Weather Underground gives you the opportunity to "share this storm". Weather.com lets you see "friends at risk." Uhh....

For storm updates in Spanish, be sure to follow Miguel Bloombito:

Did tu packo el vamos bag? No forgeto el casho, los medicatioño y tamponitos.

The WSJ has a great post comparing Sandy with Irene from last year. Sandy is much more potentially damaging in almost all respects.

On Saturday, Sandy became the largest storm in recorded Atlantic basin history, with a diameter of gale force winds of over 1000 miles. Tropical storm warnings were in place Saturday simultaneously for North Carolina and Bermuda, a sign of the storm's massive geographic sweep. Those winds will follow Sandy northward, potentially encompassing more than 50 million people at once from Virginia to New England.

Peter Kafka paraphrasing Bloomberg: "don't be stupid and it will be fine".

Satellite view of Sandy from 2:42 am last night. Massive. This thing is Day After Tomorrow big.

Zones, evacuation centers, webcams, and more on this Google Maps maps.

Chad Dickerson notes that the decentralization of NYC's stores is a plus:

the institution of the neighborhood corner store in NYC comes through for storm prep. decentralization ftw!

The secret to living foreverAARON COHEN  ·  OCT 26

The NYTimes Magazine has a story about the Greek island of Ikaria where old people just keep getting older instead of dying. There are many theories as to why this is, but my favorite in the article boils down to diet (just kidding, I like the idea about naps and sex).

Following the report by Pes and Poulain, Dr. Christina Chrysohoou, a cardiologist at the University of Athens School of Medicine, teamed up with half a dozen scientists to organize the Ikaria Study, which includes a survey of the diet of 673 Ikarians. She found that her subjects consumed about six times as many beans a day as Americans, ate fish twice a week and meat five times a month, drank on average two to three cups of coffee a day and took in about a quarter as much refined sugar -- the elderly did not like soda. She also discovered they were consuming high levels of olive oil along with two to four glasses of wine a day.

Chrysohoou also suspected that Ikarians' sleep and sex habits might have something to do with their long life. She cited a 2008 paper by the University of Athens Medical School and the Harvard School of Public Health that studied more than 23,000 Greek adults. The researchers followed subjects for an average of six years, measuring their diets, physical activity and how much they napped. They found that occasional napping was associated with a 12 percent reduction in the risk of coronary heart disease, but that regular napping -- at least three days weekly -- was associated with a 37 percent reduction. She also pointed out a preliminary study of Ikarian men between 65 and 100 that included the fact that 80 percent of them claimed to have sex regularly, and a quarter of that self-reported group said they were doing so with "good duration" and "achievement."

Louis C.K. and the Rise of the Laptop LonersOCT 26

Writing for the Los Angeles Review of Books, Adam Wilson has a thoughtful take on Louis C.K., his TV show, and his comedy style in general.

The format of the American sitcom held steady for almost 40 years. The most noteworthy innovation was a negation; in the early nineties, HBO comedies like the short-lived Dream On ditched the pervasive canned laugh track, paving the way for the so-called cringe comedy of shows like Curb Your Enthusiasm. On Curb, the absence of a laugh track makes it difficult for viewers to know when to laugh. We cringe because we're holding in laughter, waiting for a cue that it's okay to release. But there is always a breaking point, an explosion into an absurdity so deep -- Larry rushing into the water to "save" a baptismal candidate from drowning, for example -- that the tension is relieved, and the laughter is released.

Louie both reacts to the failure of Lucky Louie and advances on Curb's cringe comedy by creating something tenser, more tonally ambiguous. Louie's singularity lies in its ability to further confound viewers by setting up jokes, and then providing pathos instead of punch lines. Not only does Louie's audience not know when to laugh, they don't even know if what they're watching is supposed to be funny. For the Laptop Loner, this ambiguity is made all the more palpable by the absence of viewing partners; we use other people's reactions to gauge the correctness of our own. But it also makes the ambiguity less assaulting. Alone, we can be comfortable in our discomfort.

The worst passwords of 2012OCT 26

I cannot believe these are some of the passwords people actually use:

1. password
2, 123456
3. 12345678
4. abc123
5. qwerty
6. monkey
7. letmein
8. dragon
9. 111111
10. baseball
11. iloveyou
12. trustno1

I feel more secure than ever with my "password2" password.

Frank Sinatra Jr. is feeling fineOCT 25

Chantel Tattoli was assigned to report on Frank Sinatra, Jr's concert at the Seminole Casino Coconut Creek in Florida. And, as one does, she arranged for her father to go with her.

Two weeks ago, I told my father I'd been assigned to report Frank Sinatra, Jr.'s concert, told him I had a second press pass for a photographer. My father heard me loud and clear. He went out and bought a telescopic Nikon. It is now July 12, 2012, a Thursday. An hour ago, I showed him how to hold the camera like a pro, by cradling the lens in his left hand. We were in the parking garage waiting for an elevator. The long window looked out on the complex where a water tower sprouted behind the honey-colored stucco. Behind it was a backdrop of perfect pool blue sky. "Try to shoot that," I said, pointing. He tried. But the auto-setting didn't like the light conditions. The shot wouldn't take. "Well," my father mumbled; his eyes danced over the machine. "How do you do it manually?" It was at that point that dread began to gnaw on his daughter.

This is a wonderful little story...and there's even a faint echo of Frank Sinatra Has a Cold about it.

Riding with the Truck Stop KillerOCT 25

In 1985, Vanessa Veselka was a teenaged hitchhiker who was picked up by a man who would come to be known as the Truck Stop Killer. Nearly three decades later, she returns to the scene of that experience and writes about it for GQ: "I said I wouldn't go to the cops if nothing happened to me, but it was his choice -- until he looked at me and I went still. There was going to be no more talking. I knew in my body that it was over."

Syndicated from NextDraft. Subscribe today or grab the iOS app.

Typing KaraokeOCT 25

With Typing Karaoke, instead of singing the songs, you type along to the lyrics and get points for lack of errors and how well you keep up. Too fun!

How we workOCT 25

Rod McLaren collects links on Rodcorp and on Pinboard about how people work. He recently recapped some of the work techniques from those links. Here are a few of my favorites:

Ray Bradbury wrote an early version on Fahrenheit 451 in nine days on a rented typewriter in the UCLA library basement.

Pin Pages To Wall

Gay Talese would pin pages of his writing to a wall and examine them from the other side of the room with binoculars.

Jonathan Safran Foer has a collection of blank sheets of paper.

Truman Capote wrote lying down, as did Marcel Proust, Mark Twain and Woody Allen.

Note: Illustration by Chris Piascik...prints & more are available.

New iOS game hotness: LetterpressOCT 25

I only downloaded Letterpress about 10 minutes ago but I am already hopelessly hooked. The game is a combination of Boggle and Go and was made by Loren Brichter, who made Tweetie back in the day. This is the sort of app that makes me weep because it's so simple and polished yet endless. Brichter is some sort of iOS wizard and we should have him burned at the stake for his wonderfully addictive magic.

Why do kids cover their eyes when they're hiding?AARON COHEN  ·  OCT 25

Children often close or cover their eyes to hide, and researchers at the University of Cambridge wanted to find out why. Click through for more interesting snippets.

Now things get a little complicated. In both studies so far, when the children thought they were invisible by virtue of their eyes being covered, they nonetheless agreed that their head and their body were visible. They seemed to be making a distinction between their "self" that was hidden, and their body, which was still visible. Taken together with the fact that it was the concealment of the eyes that seemed to be the crucial factor for feeling hidden, the researchers wondered if their invisibility beliefs were based around the idea that there must be eye contact between two people -- a meeting of gazes -- for them to see each other (or at least, to see their "selves").

(via @noahwg)

The devil and Hilary MantelOCT 24

I loved this profile of novelist Hilary Mantel written by Larissa MacFarquhar. Not just for the subject matter but the lyrically novelistic way in which it's written.

During this time, she discovered that her house was haunted. It wasn't only she who felt it-she overheard adults talking about the ghosts as well. She realized that they were as frightened as she was, and were helpless to protect her. She already understood that the world was denser and more crowded than her senses could perceive: there were ghosts, but even those dead who were not ghosts still existed; she was used to hearing talk in which family members alive and dead were discussed without distinction. The dead seemed to her only barely dead.

Until she was twelve or so, she was deeply religious. "When you're inculcated with religion at such an early age, or when you're receptive to it, as I was, you become preoccupied with the unseen reality," she says. "This other world, the next world, to me in my childhood seemed just as real as the world I was living in. It wasn't that I had a mental picture of it -- it was that I never questioned its existence. I used to conduct a lot of imaginary conversations with God. I don't think Jesus was any less real to me than my aunts and uncles; the fact that I happened not to be able to see him was pretty irrelevant to me."

She felt, as a child, in a permanent state of sin. There was something terribly wrong about her, for which she was to blame, but which she had only limited ability to change. Catholic guilt continued to grip her even after she stopped believing in God. Her family's misery was encompassing and bewildering, and was it not likely that she was responsible for making her parents so unhappy? Might they not, without her, have a chance at a better life? But these suspicions were not so powerful as the effect of a thing that happened to her one day that she cannot explain.

That "thing that happened" was seeing... well, I don't want to spoil it. Mantel wrote Wolf Hall, a recent favorite of mine, and a few days after this profile ran in the New Yorker, she won the Man Booker Prize for her new novel, Bring Up the Bodies.

Richard Feynman's last interviewOCT 24

Aired as The Quest For Tannu Tuva in the UK and The Last Journey Of A Genius in the US, this hour-long program is the last extended interview that physicist Richard Feynman gave; he died a few days after the recording.

Richard Feynman was not only an iconoclastic and influential theoretical physicist and Nobel laureate but also an explorer at heart. Feynman through video recordings and comments from his friend and drumming partner Ralph Leighton tell the extraordinary story of their enchantment with Tuva, a strange and distant land in the centre of Asia.

While few Westerners knew about Tuva, Feynman discovered its existence from the unique postage stamps issued there in the early 20th century. He was intrigued by the unusual name of its capital, Kyzyl, and resolved to travel to the remote, mountainous land. However, the Soviets, who controlled access, were mistrustful, unconvinced that he was interested only in the scenery. They obstructed his plans throughout 13 years.

I could watch this guy talk all day long. Feynman is a national treasure; we should give Andrew Jackson the boot and put Feynman on the $20.

Guy Fieri gets burnt in fiery reviewOCT 24

Joshua David Stein takes Guy Fieri deep in a biting review of the ridiculous fat-food huckster's new restaurant in Times Square.

It would be disingenuous to claim that Times Square represents anything but a regurgitation of the American dream, monetized, metastasized, made blindingly bright by light-emitting diodes and shoved back down the gullets of those souls unlucky enough to have mistakenly stumbled into the red zone, or worse, like moths to the incinerating flame, have actively sought it out. To deride Mr. Fieri for opening his restaurant there as if he'd taken a dump in the Louvre is silly. He pooped on a pile of bright shiny poop, Jeff Koonsian poop, Guy Debordian poop. But public defecation is still a crime in New York City (Health Code Section 153.09), and his offenses rest not in their location but in their very nature.

Mr. Fieri not only serves truly horrible-tasting food, an awkward origami of clashing aleatory flavors, but he serves this punishing food emulsified with a bombastic recasting of deep-fried American myth. Mr. Fieri's most egregious transgression isn't what he puts into his fellow citizens' stomachs, it's how the cynical slop interfaces with what he puts into their minds.

Israel/Palestine: This Land is MineOCT 24

This video by Nina Paley about the repeated takeover of the land formerly known as Palestine is a little funny at first but then you stop laughing. By the end, it seems very much like Dr. Strangelove and you just feel uncomfortable about having chuckled at the beginning.

Paley also wrote, directed, and animated the critically acclaimed Sita Sings the Blues, which is available to watch for free online. (via @haditurk)

White whale mimics human speechOCT 24

NOC is a white whale that, for a period of four years, could make human speech-like sounds. Take a listen:

"The whale's vocalizations often sounded as if two people were conversing in the distance," says Dr. Sam Ridgway, President of the National Marine Mammal Foundation. "These 'conversations' were heard several times before the whale was eventually identified as the source. In fact, we discovered it when a diver mistook the whale for a human voice giving him underwater directions."

As soon as the whale was identified as the source, NMMF scientists recorded his speech-like episodes both in air and underwater, studying the physiology behind his ability to mimic. It's believed that the animals close association with humans played a role in how often he employed his 'human' voice, as well as in its quality.

Perhaps instead of the machines taking over as with Skynet in the Terminator movies, we should be worried about Seanet: talking whales, dolphins, and octopuses working together to fight humanity. (via @DavidGrann)

Sixth man infraction spotted 19 years after Rockets/Sonics gameOCT 23

This is one of the nuttiest sports things I have ever seen. Ethan Sherwood Strauss was rewatching a second round game from the 1993 NBA playoffs. Shawn Kemp's Seattle SuperSonics vs. Hakeem Olajuwon's Houston Rockets. Game seven. Overtime. Hakeem has the ball in the closing moments of the game. And suddenly, Strauss spies a sixth player on the court for Houston. The refs missed the extra player and so did most everyone else for the last 19 years. Take a look for yourself...the play in question starts at 16:50:

Number 22 just wanders off the bench and into the game!

Wheel! Of! Urine!OCT 23

Uroscopy is the now obsolete practice of using the smell, taste, and color of urine to diagnose illness. There were even charts to help doctors and other healers identify different types of urine.

Wheel Of Urine

Many diseases affect metabolism and many changes in metabolism can be detected in the urine. For example, diabetics will excrete sugar in their urine -- sometimes enough sugar that it can be fermented into whisky. There are many other diseases that change the smell of a person's urine, including the very descriptively named Maple Syrup Urine Disease or Sweaty Feet Syndrome, now much more likely to be diagnosed by electronic sensor arrays than actually tasting the urine.

(via edible geography)

How to permanently save and store your Kindle booksOCT 23

Our small corner of the internet freaked out yesterday when Linn Nygaard noticed that all her books had been wiped from her Kindle and her Amazon account had been closed. Nygaard's account and books have since been restored but the incident has caused many to remember that, oh yeah, the Kindle is more of a Blockbuster Video-like rental store than a reading device. To that end, Zachary West has posted instructions for converting all of your DRM'd Kindle books into a non-DRM format that you can read on any number of devices.

Drunk Jeff GoldblumOCT 23

One of my favorite "memes" of all time is Drunk Jeff Goldblum. The first video, a slowed-down ad for Apple from 1999, is still the best. "In ter net?! I'd say In ter net."

But this new one about PayPal is pretty great too.

"Buying a chair... while sitting in a chair..." (via ★interesting)

Cuts of woodAARON COHEN  ·  OCT 23

Billion, by artist Vincent Kohler, shows the different pieces of wood derived from a log. It reminds me of the iconic butchery map showing the different cuts of meat. The sculpture, interestingly, is made out of polystyrene.

vincent-kohler-billon.jpg

(via dens)

Free to Be... You and Me at 40OCT 23

Writing for Slate, Dan Kois looks back on the landmark album for kids, Free to Be... You and Me, which was released 40 years ago. Part one details how the album came to be.

[Marlo] Thomas' fruitless Martindale's shopping trip led her to the idea that her next project ought to be a collection of stories for children that avoided sexual stereotypes and promoted gender equality. She could solicit the stories and record herself reading them. It would be just like the records she and her sister had listened to in their rooms as little girls, but liberated, smarter, modern. She just had to find the stories.

Part two covers how the album was created:

The sketches were recorded at the grand MediaSound studio on West 57th Street over the course of a few days. Billy De Wolfe, Thomas's co-star on That Girl, lent his distinctive voice to several roles on the record, including the dandyish principal who plays the flute for Dudley Pippin. (Dudley Pippin himself was voiced by "Bobby Morse," better known now as cranky senior partner Bertram Cooper on Mad Men.) Some of the sessions were quite impromptu: Dick Cavett remembers getting a call from Thomas in the morning-"I had a show to tape that day, and I thought, well, God, I can't really do it, but I like her, and she does good stuff, and also I was very familiar with her face because on my daytime show the promo for That Girl ran at least 10 times during each show"-and walking the few blocks from his office to MediaSound to record that afternoon.

Mel Brooks' session was more eventful. Thomas had written to him that the album "would benefit the Ms. Foundation," and when he came in the morning of his recording, he told her that he thought the material Reiner and Stone had written was funny but that he didn't know what it had to do with multiple sclerosis. Once set straight about the MS in question, Brooks joined Thomas in the recording booth, where they would both play babies for the album's first sketch, "Boy Meets Girl."

"When I directed," Alda recalls, "I would be meticulous and relentless. I would do a lot of takes. But Mel is not a guy who's used to doing a lot of takes. He's not used to taking direction from anybody-you know, he gives direction." Alda didn't love the first few takes of "Boy Meets Girl"; in the end it took, Alda remembers, 10 or 15 tries, with Brooks improvising madly all along the way. Rodgers was there that day to record "Ladies First," and she still remembers standing in the control room laughing harder with each take. "Mel was generous," Alda allows, "and he let me egg him on."

And part three addresses the impact the album has had:

Criticism came from the other direction, too. Thomas held on to a review from the feminist newspaper Off Our Backs, which chided Free To Be for its focus on the nuclear family and hetero relationships. "The message is so upbeat and catchy and some of the messages so appealing," Fran Pollner wrote, "that the adult feminist listener may miss the first time around the basic idea of this one-hour album: that little boys and little girls should get together at a young age to ensure a solid and satisfying future marriage and family life."

"I think it was very hard in the 1970s to ever make any comment that was viewed as radical enough," laughs Laura Lovett, co-editor with Rotskoff of When We Were Free To Be. "People were holding one another to really hard and clear goals."

But of course part of the point of Free To Be was making radical feminist beliefs palatable to a broad audience that might otherwise reject them. "It was second-wave feminism that went mainstream," Rotskoff says. "It was packed with telegenic celebrities. It was performed by famous people. And the messages were both revolutionary and accessible enough for a mainstream audience."

We listen to a lot of Free to Be on long car trips. No idea whether any of it is getting through, but it's nice to have something to reference when we're talking about, for example, the maddening no-boys-allowed princess parties thrown by Ollie's school classmates. [hair tearing-out noise]

Arrested WesterosOCT 22

Last week Aaron linked to Kanye Wes. Turns out there is also Arrested Westeros (Arrested Development quotes + Game of Thrones scenes):

Arrested Westeros

Man, I wish Kanye Westeros were better. (via @JoshMorrison)

View SourceOCT 22

Rex Sorgatz is writing about a piece of video everyday at View Source, which is also an email newsletter. Or is it a newsletter with a website?

If you're like me, you suspect that YouTube is packed with interesting stuff, but we lack a system for finding it. A few interesting clips might come to you via so-called social media, but that just reinforces the feeling that there's probably more out there beyond your friends.

My hope is that VIEWSOURCE will help solve this problem. It's a simple daily email newsletter with just one video clip. It might be a long-forgotten music documentary, a new webshow with a celebrity, some crazy hip-hop video, or a new supercut. There is no "demographic" in mind, but hopefully it eschews the "viral video" genre.

Indiana Jones denied tenureOCT 22

A letter from the chairman of the Committee on Promotion and Tenure at Marshall College outlines the many reasons why they have denied Henry "Indiana" Jones Jr. tenure at the school.

Though the committee may have overstepped the boundaries of its evaluation, I find it pertinent to note that Dr. Jones has been romantically linked to countless women of questionable character, an attribute very unbecoming of a Marshall College professor. One of these women was identified as a notorious nightclub singer whose heart he attempted to extract with his hands, and whom he then tried, and failed, to lower into a lake of magma. Another was a Nazi scholar he was seen courting just last year who, I'm told, plummeted into a fathomless abyss at Dr. Jones's hand. And, of course, no one can forget the slow decline and eventual death of Professor Abner Ravenwood after Dr. Jones's affair with Abner's underage daughter was made public, forcing her to emigrate to Nepal to escape the debacle.

(via df)

Infographic of shifting US political ideologiesOCT 22

It was not my intent to be so politically oriented this morning but here we are. This is a chart that tracks the ideologies of the Democratic and Republican members of Congress from 1789 to 2010. As you can see, the shift away from the center by the Republicans since 1975 is unprecedented, perhaps matched only by the shift toward the center by the Democrats beginning in 1921 and ending in 1945.

Political Ideology

This reminds me of a timeline created circa 1880 for a book called Conspectus of the History of Political Parties and the Federal Government:

Political Parties 1880

Bigger version here. (via @joecarryon)

Is the US becoming an extractive state?OCT 22

Following up on her piece in the New Yorker on how hedge fund billionaires have become disillusioned with President Obama, Chrystia Freeland says that the 1% are repeating a mistake made many times throughout history of moving from an inclusive economic system to an extractive one.

Extractive states are controlled by ruling elites whose objective is to extract as much wealth as they can from the rest of society. Inclusive states give everyone access to economic opportunity; often, greater inclusiveness creates more prosperity, which creates an incentive for ever greater inclusiveness.

Freeland is riffing on an argument forwarded by Daron Acemoglu and James Robinson in Why Nations Fail. Their chief example cited by Freeland is that of Venice:

In the early 14th century, Venice was one of the richest cities in Europe. At the heart of its economy was the colleganza, a basic form of joint-stock company created to finance a single trade expedition. The brilliance of the colleganza was that it opened the economy to new entrants, allowing risk-taking entrepreneurs to share in the financial upside with the established businessmen who financed their merchant voyages.

Venice's elites were the chief beneficiaries. Like all open economies, theirs was turbulent. Today, we think of social mobility as a good thing. But if you are on top, mobility also means competition. In 1315, when the Venetian city-state was at the height of its economic powers, the upper class acted to lock in its privileges, putting a formal stop to social mobility with the publication of the Libro d'Oro, or Book of Gold, an official register of the nobility. If you weren't on it, you couldn't join the ruling oligarchy.

The political shift, which had begun nearly two decades earlier, was so striking a change that the Venetians gave it a name: La Serrata, or the closure. It wasn't long before the political Serrata became an economic one, too. Under the control of the oligarchs, Venice gradually cut off commercial opportunities for new entrants. Eventually, the colleganza was banned. The reigning elites were acting in their immediate self-interest, but in the longer term, La Serrata was the beginning of the end for them, and for Venetian prosperity more generally. By 1500, Venice's population was smaller than it had been in 1330. In the 17th and 18th centuries, as the rest of Europe grew, the city continued to shrink.

BTW, Acemoglu and Robinson have been going back and forth with Jared Diamond about the latter's geographical hypothesis for national differences in prosperity forwarded in Guns, Germs, and Steel. I read 36% of Why Nations Fail earlier in the year...I should pick it back up again.

The New Yorker endorses Barack ObamaOCT 22

Not a surprise really, but the New Yorker's endorsement of Obama for President is a clear headed assessment of his first term and an effect critique against the "increasingly reactionary and rigid" Republican Party which Romney, to his discredit, has aligned himself with.

Perhaps inevitably, the President has disappointed some of his most ardent supporters. Part of their disappointment is a reflection of the fantastical expectations that attached to him. Some, quite reasonably, are disappointed in his policy failures (on Guantánamo, climate change, and gun control); others question the morality of the persistent use of predator drones. And, of course, 2012 offers nothing like the ecstasy of taking part in a historical advance: the reëlection of the first African-American President does not inspire the same level of communal pride. But the reëlection of a President who has been progressive, competent, rational, decent, and, at times, visionary is a serious matter. The President has achieved a run of ambitious legislative, social, and foreign-policy successes that relieved a large measure of the human suffering and national shame inflicted by the Bush Administration. Obama has renewed the honor of the office he holds.

This paragraph is terrifying:

In pursuit of swing voters, Romney and Ryan have sought to tamp down, and keep vague, the extremism of their economic and social commitments. But their signals to the Republican base and to the Tea Party are easily read: whatever was accomplished under Obama will be reversed or stifled. Bill Clinton has rightly pointed out that most Presidents set about fulfilling their campaign promises. Romney, despite his pose of chiselled equanimity, has pledged to ravage the safety net, oppose progress on marriage equality, ignore all warnings of ecological disaster, dismantle health-care reform, and appoint right-wing judges to the courts. Four of the nine Supreme Court Justices are in their seventies; a Romney Administration may well have a chance to replace two of the more liberal incumbents, and Romney's adviser in judicial affairs is the embittered far-right judge and legal scholar Robert Bork. The rightward drift of a court led by Justices Roberts, Scalia, Thomas, and Alito -- a drift marked by appalling decisions like Citizens United -- would only intensify during a Romney Presidency. The consolidation of a hard-right majority would be a mortal threat to the ability of women to make their own decisions about contraception and pregnancy, the ability of institutions to alleviate the baneful legacies of past oppression and present prejudice, and the ability of American democracy to insulate itself from the corrupt domination of unlimited, anonymous money. Romney has pronounced himself "severely conservative." There is every reason to believe him.

The endorsements of major newspapers can be tracked here.

What is it like to be on Jeopardy?OCT 20

Technology journalist Glenn Fleishman appeared on Jeopardy on Thursday and wrote up a piece for Boing Boing on his experience.

The secret of Jeopardy, what defuses the reality-show aspect, is that we all universally wanted each other to win even though we knew that only one person took home the big money and would return to fight again.

Here's Glenn's Final Jeopardy from that night:

I wouldn't have gotten that question in a millions years. Maybe in high school...

Updates on previous entries for Oct 19, 2012*OCT 20

The Rolling Stones cover the Beatles in 1965 orig. from Oct 19, 2012
Early color photography orig. from Sep 04, 2009

* Q: Wha? A: These previously published entries have been updated with new information in the last 24 hours. You can find past updates here.

Final trailer for the Arrested Development documentaryOCT 19

In production for the past twenty-four years, it looks as though the documentary about Arrested Development might be nearing its release. Here's the final trailer:

(via devour)

Twitter, Facebook, and old new mediaOCT 19

Newsweek announced yesterday that the print magazine will cease publication and the entire thing will move to an all-digital format.

Newsweek Global, as the all-digital publication will be named, will be a single, worldwide edition targeted for a highly mobile, opinion-leading audience who want to learn about world events in a sophisticated context. Newsweek Global will be supported by paid subscription and will be available through e-readers for both tablet and the Web, with select content available on The Daily Beast.

In talking about the shift on his Daily Beast blog, Andrew Sullivan notes something interesting about reading online vs. reading in print (emphasis mine):

Which is why, when asked my opinion at Newsweek about print and digital, I urged taking the plunge as quickly as possible. Look: I chose digital over print 12 years ago, when I shifted my writing gradually online, with this blog and now blogazine. Of course a weekly newsmagazine on paper seems nuts to me. But it takes guts to actually make the change. An individual can, overnight. An institution is far more cumbersome. Which is why, I believe, institutional brands will still be at a disadvantage online compared with personal ones. There's a reason why Drudge Report and the Huffington Post are named after human beings. It's because when we read online, we migrate to read people, not institutions. Social media has only accelerated this development, as everyone with a Facebook page now has a mini-blog, and articles or posts or memes are sent by email or through social networks or Twitter.

People do tend to read people and not institutions online but a shift away from that has already started happening. A shift back to institutions, actually. Pre-1990s, people read the Times or Newsweek or Time or whatever. In 2008, people read Andrew Sullivan's Daily Dish or Paul Krugman's column in the Times or Gwyneth Paltrow's GOOP. Today, people read feeds of their friends/followees activities, interests, thoughts, and links on sites like Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest, and Tumblr, i.e. the new media institutions.

Now, you may follow Daily Dish or Krugman on Twitter but that's not quite the same as reading the sites; you're not getting the whole post/article on Twitter, Krugman items are intermingled & fighting for attention with tweets from @horse_ebooks & Lady Gaga, and if you unfollowed Krugman altogether, you'll find when he writes something especially good, someone else in your Twitter stream will point you to it pretty quickly. That is, Twitter or Facebook will provide you with the essential Krugman without you having to pay any attention to Krugman at all.

What that means is what blogs and the web are doing to newspapers and magazines, so might Facebook & Twitter do to blogs. Blogs might not even get the chance to be called old media before they're handed their hats. It'll be interesting to see how smartphone/tablet apps affect this dynamic...will apps push users/readers back toward old media institutions, individuals, or the friend-packaging institutions like Twitter?

Color photos of Nazi-occupied Poland, 1939-1940OCT 19

German photographer Hugo Jaeger traveled around Poland after the Nazi invasion and documented daily life there. Life has a selection of Jaeger's color photos from that time.

Jaeger Poland

Why would Hugo Jaeger, a photographer dedicated to lionizing Adolf Hitler and the "triumphs" of the Third Reich, choose to immortalize conquered Jews in Warsaw and Kutno (a small town in central Poland) in such an uncharacteristic, intimate manner? Most German photographers working in the same era as Jaeger usually focused on the Wehrmacht; on Nazi leaders; and on the military victories the Reich was so routinely enjoying in the earliest days of the Second World War. Those pictures frequently document brutal acts of humiliation, even as they glorify German troops.

The photographs that Jaeger made in the German ghettos in occupied Poland, on the other hand, convey almost nothing of the triumphalism seen in so many of his other photographs. Here, in fact, there is virtually no German military presence at all. We see the devastation in the landscape of the German invasion of Poland, but very little of the "master race" itself.

It is, of course, impossible to fully recreate exactly what Jaeger had in mind, but from the reactions of the people portrayed in these images in Warsaw and Kutno, there appears to be surprising little hostility between the photographer and his subjects. Most of the people in these pictures, Poles and Jews, are smiling at the camera. They trust Jaeger, and are as curious about this man with a camera as he is about them. In this curiosity, there is no sense of hatred. The men, women and children on the other side of the lens and Jaeger look upon one another without the aggression and tension characteristic of the relationship between perpetrator and victim.

It's still amazing the extent to which early color photography can transport us back to the past in a way that black & white photography or even video cannot.

Kanye Wes AndersonAARON COHEN  ·  OCT 19

Kanye Wes Anderson is a Tumblr posting screencaps of Wes Anderson moves mashed with Kanye West lyrics resulting in a good time for all. Plus, Kanye and Wes totally hang out.

Kanye-wes-anderson-1.jpg

kanye-wes-anderson-2.jpg

(via @ryansholin)

The Rolling Stones cover the Beatles in 1965OCT 19

Here are the Rolling Stones touring Ireland in 1965, messing around in what looks like a hotel room, playing a couple of Beatles tunes, I've Just Seen a Face and Eight Days a Week.

Jagger at least seems to be taking the piss more than honestly enjoying the music of his fellow British invasion personnel. (via dangerous minds)

Update: From Andy Baio, a reminder that The Stones' first top 20 single was a cover of The Beatles' I Wanna Be Your Man.

A visit to the last sensory deprivation tank in New YorkOCT 19

Mary HK Choi takes an hour-long journey in the last remaining sensory deprivation tank in New York.

Okay. This is when you realize you had a picture in your mind about an isolation tank, so you're going to be simultaneously bummed out and fully relieved that the tank isn't one of them lock-down joints from "Fringe." This one basically looks like a huge bathtub, enclosed behind an upright sliding shower door that's black and features a handsome wooden handle. There is no lid. The darkness is your lid, just as it's always been. (JK JK, I don't even know what that means!) This is good, because you don't have to worry about suffocating on your own carbon dioxide because you don't experience that thing where your breath breathes back at you because you're panting and watching the intruder from inside your closet that is so very small. :(

The water-"water"-is set at exactly body temp, so don't expect that tingly sensation of sliding into a hot tub. And remember that it's saline solution, so don't get it on your face. It's not that tricky, since you'll slide in so that you're on your back. So your eyes, nose and mouth are completely exposed and floating, as well as your toes, the tops of your thighs and a half-bagel of your belly (or full bagel depending on the day).

Updates on previous entries for Oct 18, 2012*OCT 19

Girl with a Pearl Earring and Point-and-Shoot Camera orig. from Oct 18, 2012

* Q: Wha? A: These previously published entries have been updated with new information in the last 24 hours. You can find past updates here.

The colorful Danxia mountains of ChinaOCT 18

Danxia refers to a "type of petrographic geomorphology" found in China. What that means is you get these mountains that look as though they were decorated with crayons by a five-year-old channelling Dalí.

Danxia Mountains

That shot was taken by Melinda ^..^ on Flickr...you can find dozens of her Danxia photos here. A kottke.org reader suggests that Tiny Wings creator Andreas Illiger was influenced by the Danxia landforms in developing the iconic scenery for the game.

Tiny Wings Danxia

Not a bad theory. (thx, christopher)

?uestlove to teach class about classic albumsAARON COHEN  ·  OCT 18

The Roots drummer, ?uestlove, will be schooling kids left and right this spring as he teaches a class on classic albums at NYU. It's too bad this isn't a high school class so my Young MC 'Principal's Office' reference would fit better.

The course will include lectures on albums such as Sly & The Family Stone's There's a Riot Goin' On, Aretha Franklin's Lady Soul, Led Zeppelin's IV, Prince's Dirty Mind, Michael Jackson's Off the Wall, and the Beastie Boys' Paul's Boutique.

They'll also cover what constitutes a "classic" or "seminal" album, looking at the music, lyrics, production, and business behind great albums.

Billboard reports that the course was inspired by an NPR blog post over the summer where an intern reviewed Public Enemy's It Takes A Nation of Millions To Hold Us Back, an album he'd never heard before. ?uestlove responded to the dismissive review in the comments, prompting NYU's Jason King to invite ?uestlove and Weinger to teach the course.

99 life hacks to make your life easierOCT 18

I've never seen so much household organizational porn collected in one place before. Tumblr should get a Nobel Peace Prize for propagating such useful information so far and wide. A couple of examples:

Popcorn Hack

Toast Hack

(via hacker news)

Girl with a Pearl Earring and Point-and-Shoot CameraOCT 18

This forgotten Vermeer has been floating around for a few months but I just saw it. Love it:

Girl Pearl Earring Camera

Anyone know who did this? I spent a few minutes trying to find out but got dead-ended in a Tumblr/Imgur attribution black hole. (via ★ryanvlower)

Update: The creator of the image is supposedly Mitchell Grafton, although I couldn't find any airtight attribution. (thx, all)

The Full Scale Millennium Falcon ProjectOCT 18

Chris Lee and his friends have embarked on a project to build a 1:1 scale model of the Millennium Falcon, complete with a correctly scaled interior.

I own a secluded 88 acre tract of wooded land where we'll be building. We have selected a site on the property that is low enough so that the top of the Falcon can be seen easily from several vantage points. A flat area roughly 400' x 400' is being cleared. And yes, I am aware that it will eventually show up on Google Earth and Google Maps. I'm counting on that.

Cannonball on frozen poolAARON COHEN  ·  OCT 17

There isn't much to say about this one except I majored in German so it was easy for me to translate "Owa, mein Arsch" to "Ow, my ass."

(via laughing squid)

Study: multivitamins reduce cancer riskOCT 17

Over the past few years, we've seen an endless parade of stories debunking the value of many of the products that line the shelves of our local pharmacies. Well, here's a different kind of story. A massive study that included more than 15,000 men and lasted more than 13 years found that taking a daily multivitamin (in this case Centrum Silver) reduced the risk of cancer. It looks like there's something to taking one multivitamin as opposed to swallowing high doses of individual vitamins.

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Pitching the shoesOCT 17

Brian Simmons is one of the two best horseshoe pitchers in the world. Without giving too much away about the story, he's overcome a lot to reach that status.

Brian Simmons does not like the clay at this year's World Horseshoe Tournament in Knoxville, Tenn. It's powdery, slippery. Even the non-horseshoe pitchers can tell this, because the bleachers in the convention center, where the tournament is being held, are coated in a light gray dust and the concrete floor has gotten more slick with each passing day. The clay dust gets on Simmons's shoes and then the shoes slip out of his hand. It's supposed to be Kentucky Blue Clay but that is hard to believe. More like Kentucky Synthetic, one man says. It makes it damn hard to pitch a horseshoe with the accuracy normally attributed to a man like Simmons.

This is what Simmons is thinking about as he stares down a 14-inch tall stake. He is thinking about the slippery clay, and how he might adjust his release point, and as these thoughts slip into his brain, he has lost without even pitching the shoe.

Also, I have been throwing horseshoes wrong all these years.

Watermarking the classicsOCT 17

What if Andreas Gursky, Garry Winogrand, and Henri Cartier-Bresson put cheesy watermarks all over their photographs?

Cartier Bresson Watermark

(via @jenbee)

25 richest people of all timeOCT 17

From a site called Celebrity Net Worth (I know, blech), a list of the 25 richest people of all time, adjusted for inflation. Gates, Buffett, and Rockefeller all make the list but the big cheese is Malian emperor Mansa Musa I, with a net worth of $400 billion in today's dollars.

Mansa Musa I of Mali is the richest human being in history with a personal net worth of $400 billion! Mansa Musa lived from 1280 - 1337 and ruled the Malian Empire which covered modern day Ghana, Timbuktu and Mali in West Africa. Mansa Musa's shocking wealth came from his country's vast production of more than half the world's supply of salt and gold.

(via @DavidGrann)

Earth-sized planet found only 4.3 light years awayOCT 16

A European team of exoplanet hunters has discovered a planet about the size of Earth orbiting Alpha Centauri B, which is in a group of stars closest to the solar system, a mere 4.3 light years away. Lee Billings explains the significance.

At a distance of just over 4.3 light years, the stars of Alpha Centauri are only a cosmic stone's throw away. To reach Alpha Centauri B b, as this new world is called, would require a journey of some 25 trillion miles. For comparison, the next-nearest known exoplanet is a gas giant orbiting the orange star Epsilon Eridani, more than twice as far away. But don't pack your bags quite yet. With a probable surface temperature well above a thousand degrees Fahrenheit, Alpha Centauri B b is no Goldilocks world. Still, its presence is promising: Planets tend to come in packs, and some theorists had believed no planets at all could form in multi-star systems like Alpha Centauri, which are more common than singleton suns throughout our galaxy. It seems increasingly likely that small planets exist around most if not all stars, near and far alike, and that Alpha Centauri B may possess additional worlds further out in clement, habitable orbits, tantalizingly within reach.

Human-powered helicopters are hard to buildOCT 16

A team at the University of Maryland are building a human-powered helicopter in an attempt to win the Igor I. Sikorsky Human Powered Helicopter Competition. To win the $250,000 prize, the helicopter must fly for 60 seconds, reach a momentary altitude of 3 meters, and stay within a 10 meter square. This is surprisingly difficult.

The NPR story that the video accompanies is here. (via ★interesting)

Clouds Over CubaOCT 16

Today marks the 50th anniversary of the beginning of the Cuban Missile Crisis. In commemoration of the event, the JFK Presidential Library & Museum presents Clouds Over Cuba, a tense and engaging presentation on the Crisis and, even more strikingly, a dramatization on what might have happened had things gone differently. This is really well done and worth taking 10-15 minutes to watch/listen. (via @alexismadrigal)

Women of science postersOCT 16

I love these posters featuring six women who changed science and the world. Hard to pick a favorite but I'll go with the Sally Ride one:

Sally Ride Poster

The Rosalind Franklin poster is a close second. The same artist also did this wonderfully minimalist poster for Louis Braille.

ps. Today is Ada Lovelace Day!

N Is a Number: A Portrait of Paul ErdosOCT 16

N Is a Number is an hour-long documentary about Hungarian mathematician Paul Erdős.

Erdős was famously a prolific mathematician who collaborated widely....he coauthored over 1500 papers with 500 different collaborators. He was also a homeless methamphetamine user.

The most powerful TV shows of the past 25 yearsOCT 16

This is a really interesting and eclectic list of 25 TV shows that have had an impact on society beyond the water cooler. There are a few obvious choices, but most of these I hadn't heard of.

In 2003, 24-year-old machinist Juan Catalan faced the death penalty for allegedly shooting a key witness in a murder case. Catalan told police that he couldn't have committed the crime -- he was at a Los Angeles Dodgers game at the time. He had the ticket stubs and everything!

When police didn't buy his alibi, Catalan contacted the Dodgers, who pointed him to an unlikely hero: misanthropic comedian Larry David. On the day in question, David had been filming an episode of Curb Your Enthusiasm in Dodger Stadium. It was a long shot, but maybe Catalan could be seen in the background. When his attorney watched the outtakes, it took just 20 minutes to find shots of Catalan and his daughter chowing down on ballpark dogs while watching from the stands.

Thanks to the footage, Catalan walked free after five months behind bars. And Larry David found one more thing to be self-deprecating about. "I tell people that I've done one decent thing in my life, albeit inadvertently," joked David.

(via @fimoculous)

The world's best audition (for Elliott in E.T.)OCT 15

I've never seen a better audition tape than this improvised scene by Henry Thomas for the part of Elliott in E.T.

The tears were inspired by thoughts of his dead dog. And the final line from Spielberg is gold. (via @Colossal)

Unexplained soundsOCT 15

Bloop Mystery Noise

Every once in awhile, something somewhere will make a sound and no one really knows where it came from. Among the unexplained sounds listed on Wikipedia are mistpouffers, The Bloop, The Hum, and Julia.

The NOAA's Dr. Christopher Fox does not believe its origin is man-made, such as a submarine or bomb, or familiar geological events such as volcanoes or earthquakes. While the audio profile of the Bloop does resemble that of a living creature, the source is a mystery both because it is different from known sounds and because it was several times louder than the loudest recorded animal, the blue whale.

Note: Illustration by Chris Piascik...prints & more are available.

Underwater photography that looks like paintingAARON COHEN  ·  OCT 15

In Reckless Unbound, photographer Christy Rogers takes photographs of brightly-clothed people underwater resulting in photos that resemble Baroque paintings. GUP Magazine says:

Without the use of post-production manipulation, Rogers' works are made in-camera, on the spot, in water and at night. She applies her technique to bodies submerged in water during tropical nights in Hawaii. Through a fragile process of experimentation, she builds elaborate scenes of coalesced colours and entangled bodies that exalt the human character as one of vigour and warmth, while also capturing the beauty and vulnerability of the tragic experience that is the human condition.

Christy-Rogers-Origin-of-the-Universe.jpg

(via @robinsloan)

Photos of the Space Shuttle being driven through Los AngelesOCT 15

On Saturday, the Space Shuttle Endeavour was driven 12 miles through the streets of Los Angeles on its way to the California Science Center. It was a tight fit at times.

Space Shuttle LA

Updates on previous entries for Oct 15, 2012*OCT 15

Watch live: record freefall jump from edge of space orig. from Oct 14, 2012

* Q: Wha? A: These previously published entries have been updated with new information in the last 24 hours. You can find past updates here.

Suit cam view of Felix Baumgartner's jumpOCT 15

Here's some footage from the camera affixed to Felix Baumgartner's chest during his record-breaking jump:

It's frightening how fast he starts spinning. And then he really starts whipping around...watch the Sun's reflection in his visor.

Lego version of Felix Baumgartner's record jumpOCT 14

This has got to be some sort of record for quickest Lego parody of an event: watch as a Lego man jumps from a balloon hanging high in the air, just like Felix.

(via ★thoughtbrain)

Watch live: record freefall jump from edge of spaceOCT 14

Watch live as Felix Baumgartner jumps from a balloon more than 120,000 feet in the air.

Update: The jump was successful! The YT video above is now private but here are some highlights from the mission:

Aerial nude photographyOCT 12

From New Zealand photographer John Crawford, a series called Aerial Nudes.

Aerial Nudes

Technically not safe for work but your coworkers would need to be sitting at your desk with a magnifying glass to be offended so... (via @coudal)

Partysaurus RexOCT 12

Pixar is showing this short in front of Finding Nemo 3D in the theaters. It's funny, a little disturbing, and perfect for the kids.

The embed is relatively low quality -- way to make your awesome short film look like shit, Disney/Pixar! -- so you should head over to their site to see it in crisp HD. (via ★pieratt)

Updates on previous entries for Oct 11, 2012*OCT 12

Barbican's Rain Room orig. from Oct 10, 2012

* Q: Wha? A: These previously published entries have been updated with new information in the last 24 hours. You can find past updates here.

Six TV networks that started out as something elseOCT 11

There was a time when American Movie Classics used to show classic American movies, when The Learning Channel could teach you something, and when ABC Family broadcast family programming. Wired's Ruth Suehle has a look at six TV networks that have significantly changed their programming since their founding. The story of ABC Family, which used to be known as The Family Channel, is especially interesting:

Plan A was to use it for ABC re-runs. Too bad [ABC] didn't own the syndication rights to the stuff they wanted to show.

Plan B was an image makeover. They'd rename it XYZ (as in the opposite of ABC) and sell it to a younger, edgier audience. Too bad nobody read the contract that said the word "family" had to stay in the name forever.

Why? For that, we rewind to its beginning as Pat Robertson's Christian Broadcasting Network Satellite Service in 1979. That religious beginning followed the network through multiple sales, each of which has been required to continue broadcasting Robertson's The 700 Club, hence the reason that show is now bookended by the disclaimer, "The following/preceding CBN telecast does not reflect the views of ABC Family"as well as the network's slogan of the last few years, "A New Kind of Family."

(via @moth)

Are you currently on the internet?OCT 11

In response to some blogfight I don't really understand or care too much about, Choire Sicha published a handy guide for determining whether you are on the internet or not.

Sometimes it's hard to tell if you are on the Internet or not. For example you are almost always typing into a box on a series of screens on your computer. Because of this, there are whole sections of the Internet that are pretty sure they are not on the Internet, because, they are just boxes, right? You could be typing into anything, who knows if it's public. This was true about LiveJournal for a long time. When you would link to a posting on LiveJournal, back in the day, you would get outraged emails about invasion of privacy. Because in their minds, they were just typing in their diary.

Culture as a type of technologyAARON COHEN  ·  OCT 11

Korean pop music or K-pop has been steadily gaining popularity outside of Korea the last several years, and most of the artists share the trait of having been developed in a music factory. John Seabrook in the New Yorker looks at what the head of the first of these factories calls "cultural technology." There's a lot of fascinating stuff in this article.

In effect, Lee combined his ambitions as a music impresario with his training as an engineer to create the blueprint for what became the K-pop idol assembly line. His stars would be made, not born, according to a sophisticated system of artistic development that would make the star factory that Berry Gordy created at Motown look like a mom-and-pop operation. Lee called his system "cultural technology." In a 2011 address at Stanford Business School, he explained, "I coined this term about fourteen years ago, when S.M. decided to launch its artists and cultural content throughout Asia. The age of information technology had dominated most of the nineties, and I predicted that the age of cultural technology would come next." He went on, "S.M. Entertainment and I see culture as a type of technology. But cultural technology is much more exquisite and complex than information technology."

[...]

Lee and his colleagues produced a manual of cultural technology--it's known around S.M. as C.T.--that catalogued the steps necessary to popularize K-pop artists in different Asian countries. The manual, which all S.M. employees are instructed to learn, explains when to bring in foreign composers, producers, and choreographers; what chord progressions to use in what country; the precise color of eyeshadow a performer should wear in a particular country; the exact hand gestures he or she should make; and the camera angles to be used in the videos (a three-hundred-and-sixty-degree group shot to open the video, followed by a montage of individual closeups).

The 50 best films of the 1990sOCT 11

The AV Club has compiled a list of the 50 best films of the 1990s, which decade, when you look at this list, is starting to feel like a bit of a film golden age compared to now. Here's part one, part two, and part three.

Few talk about the '90s as a filmmaking renaissance on par with the late '60s and early '70s, but for many of the film critics at The A.V. Club, it was the decade when we were coming of age as cinephiles and writers, and we remember it with considerable affection. Those '70s warhorses like Martin Scorsese and Robert Altman posted some of the strongest work of their careers, and an exciting new generation of filmmakers -- Quentin Tarantino, Joel and Ethan Coen, Wong Kar-Wai, Olivier Assayas, David Fincher, and Wes Anderson among them -- were staking out territory of their own.

I've seen 35 of the 50 films and some of my favorites are Election, Eyes Wide Shut, Fargo, Groundhog Day, Boogie Nights, Being John Malkovich, Rushmore, Reservoir Dogs, Dazed and Confused, and Pulp Fiction. Some films I'm surprised didn't make the list: Iron Giant, Three Kings, Babe: Pig in the City, and The Insider.

Barbican's Rain RoomAARON COHEN  ·  OCT 10

Artists in the UK have created a 'Rain Room' inside the Barbican that gives the impression from the outside that it is pouring rain. 3D cameras make it so the rain stops when you walk through it. That is, the rain is everywhere you aren't, and you don't get wet at all.

(via ★adamkuban)

Update: Neglected to mention the Rain Room is an installation by rAndom International artists Stuart Wood and Hannes Koch.

DNA has a 521-year half-lifeOCT 10

Researchers in Copenhagan and Perth used DNA found in the leg bones of the extinct moa bird to determine the half-life of DNA: 521 years.

By comparing the specimens' ages and degrees of DNA degradation, the researchers calculated that DNA has a half-life of 521 years. That means that after 521 years, half of the bonds between nucleotides in the backbone of a sample would have broken; after another 521 years half of the remaining bonds would have gone; and so on.

The team predicts that even in a bone at an ideal preservation temperature of -5 ºC, effectively every bond would be destroyed after a maximum of 6.8 million years. The DNA would cease to be readable much earlier -- perhaps after roughly 1.5 million years, when the remaining strands would be too short to give meaningful information.

That means no real-life Jurassic Park, folks.

Title sequence for The Simpsons done with real actorsOCT 10

(via devour)

The sushi of Jiro's dreams will run you $20/minuteOCT 10

Sukiyabashi Jiro is a 3-star Michelin restaurant in Tokyo that many say serves the best sushi in the world. The chef/owner, 86-year-old Jiro Ono, was the subject of last year's excellent Jiro Dreams of Sushi documentary film.

Adam Goldberg of A Life Worth Eating ate at Sukiyabashi Jiro yesterday. The meal was 21 courses, about US$380 per person (according the web site, excluding drinks), and lasted only 19 minutes. That's more than a course a minute and, Goldberg estimates, around $20 per person per minute. And apparently totally worth it.

Jiro's sushi

Goldberg has photos of each course up on Flickr and his site has a write-up of his 2009 meal.

Three slices of tuna came next, akami, chu-toro, and oo-toro increasing from lean, to medium fatty, to extremely fatty cuts. The akami (lean toro) was the most tender slice of tuna I've ever tasted that did not contain noticeable marbelization. The tuna was marinated in soy sauce for several minutes before service, perhaps contributing to this unique texture. The medium fatty tuna had an interesting mix of crunch and fat, while the fatty tuna just completely melted in my mouth. My friend with whom I shared this meal began to tear (I kid you not).

Lest you think Goldberg's meal was an anomaly, this is a typical meal at Sukiyabashi Jiro. Dave Arnold wrote about his experience earlier this year:

The sushi courses came out at a rate of one per minute. 19 courses in 19 minutes. No ordering, no real talking -- just making sushi and eating sushi. After the sushi is done you are motioned to leave the sushi bar and sit at a booth where you are served your melon. We took that melon at a leisurely 10 minute pace, leaving us with a bill of over $300 per person for just under 30 minutes time. Nastassia and Mark thought the pace was absurd and unpleasant. They felt obliged to keep up with Jiro's pace. I didn't feel obliged, but kept up anyway. I didn't mind the speed. I could have easily eaten even faster, but I'm an inhuman eating machine -- or so I'm told. At the end of the meal, Jiro went outside the restaurant and stood guard at the entrance, waiting to bid us formal adieu. This made Nastassia even more nervous about rushing to get out. Not me. At over 10 dollars a minute I have no problem letting an 86 year old man stand and wait for me to finish my melon if he wants to.

(via ★kathryn)

What percentage Neanderthal are you?OCT 10

In the last few years, scientists have discovered that before Neanderthals went extinct around 30,000 years ago, they interbred with modern humans. As a result, many humans alive today contain Neanderthal DNA in their genomes, typically between 1-4%.

Yesterday, a few of the editors at The Atlantic had their genes analyzed for Neanderthal DNA: Alexis Madrigal had 3.6%, Steve Clemons had 4.3%, and James Fallows had 5%. Personal genetic information company 23andMe added the ability to determine your Neanderthal DNA percentage a few months ago and it turns out 2.7% of my DNA is from Neanderthals, compared to 2.5% for the average 23andMe user.

If you have a 23andMe acct, you can check your percentage by logging in and going to "Ancestry Labs" in the sidebar.

How wine corks are madeOCT 09

My son thinks corks grow on trees...not sure whether to pop his bubble on this or not.

How Corks Are Made

It all starts in the forest. Cork oaks are harvested every nine years, once they reach maturity. It doesn't harm the tree, and the cork bark regrows. Most cork forests are in Portugal and Spain.

Parkour on a road bikeOCT 09

Martyn Ashton takes a carbon fiber road bike (the same bike Bradley Wiggins won the Tour de France with) and does some trials riding with it. It's a bit like recreating the Mini Cooper chase scene in the Bourne Identity with a Bugatti Veyron.

(thx, alex)

The fancy gentlemen from the CongoOCT 09

Gentlemen of Bacongo is a book of photography by Daniele Tamagni documenting a group of men from the Congo who dress in designer suits. Meet Le Sapeurs.

Daniele Tamagni

Photographer Daniele Tamagni's new book Gentlemen of Bacongo captures the fascinating subculture of the Congo in which men (and a few women) dress in designer and handmade suits and other luxury items. The movement, called Le Sape, combines French styles from their colonial roots and the individual's (often flamboyant) style. Le Sapeurs, as they're called, wear pink suits and D&G belts while living in the slums of this coastal African region.

In interviews with some notable sapeurs, Tamagni unearths the complex and varied rules and standards of Le Sape, short for Société des Ambianceurs et des Personnes Élégantes, or the Society of Tastemakers and Elegant People. Sapeur Michel comments on the strange combination of poverty and fashion, "A Congolese sapeur is a happy man even if he does not eat, because wearing proper clothes feeds the soul and gives pleasure to the body."

Solange Knowles recently shot Losing You in South Africa and it features many gentlemen of Le Sape. Tamagni went along as an advisor and photographed Solange along the way. (via @youngna)

The arrested development of Lionel MessiOCT 09

This long ESPN piece about Lionel Messi and his hometown of Rosario, Argentina made me sad.

The next time people in Rosario heard his name, he was a star. "It is difficult to be a hero in your own city," explained Marcelo Ramirez, a family friend and radio host who showed us text messages from Messi. "He didn't grow up here. It's like he lost contact with the people. He is more an international figure than a Rosarino."

The Argentine national team coaches found out about him through a videotape, and the first time they sent him an invitation to join the squad, they addressed it to "Leonel Mecci." In the 2006 and 2010 World Cups, playing outside the familiar Barcelona system, he struggled, at least in the expectant eyes of his countrymen. His coaches and teammates didn't understand the aloof Messi, who once went to a team-building barbecue and never said a word, not even to ask for meat. The people from Argentina thought he was Spanish, and in the cafes and pool halls, they wondered why he always won championships for Barcelona but never for his own country. They raged when he didn't sing the national anthem before games. In Barcelona, Messi inspired the same reaction. People noticed he didn't speak Catalan and protected his Rosarino accent. He bought meat from an Argentine butcher and ate in Argentine restaurants. "Barcelona is not his place in the world," influential Spanish soccer editor Aitor Lagunas wrote in an e-mail. "It's a kind of a laboral emigrant with an undisguised homesick feeling."

In many ways, he is a man without a country.

John Lennon's posterOCT 09

Peter Dean is a big Beatles fan. And so he set out to reproduce exactly -- from photographic evidence only -- an old circus poster owned by John Lennon. In true Sgt. Pepper's fashion, he had a little help from his friends.

This is a reproduction of the poster that inspired John Lennon to write the song Being for the Benefit of Mr. Kite!, which appeared on The Beatles' 1967 album Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band. It is printed in a limited edition of 1,967.

Lennon bought the poster in an antiques shop and hung it in his music room. While writing for Sgt. Pepper one day, he drew inspiration from the quirky, old-fashioned language and set the words to music.

A limited edition letterpress reproduction of the poster is available for sale.

Rothko defaced at Tate ModernAARON COHEN  ·  OCT 08

A 1958 Mark Rothko painting worth millions of dollars, Black On Maroon, was defaced by graffiti at the Tate Modern on Sunday. The vandalism was some sort of 'artistic statement' by a guy with a neck tattoo.

Questions will be asked about security at the gallery, where the Rothkos are not protected by glass and are separated from visitors only be a low-level barrier that can easily be stepped over.

Typically, each room is monitored by a single gallery attendant.

It was Rothko himself who stipulated how his work should be displayed at the Tate.

The defaced painting was one of a series commissioned from Rothko in 1958 for the Four Seasons restaurant in New York's Seagram Building, but never installed.

In 1969, the artist donated nine of the paintings to the Tate on the proviso that they be displayed "as an immersive environment". He died the following year.

OSU Marching Band tribute to classic video gamesAARON COHEN  ·  OCT 07

The halftime show of the OSU vs Nebraska football game featured the OSU Marching Band's tribute to classic video games. This is a 9 minute video, and I surprised myself by watching the whole thing. Tetris at 1:25 is fantastic, and the running horse at 6:00 EXTRA fantastic.

(via @wilw)

You've got such beautiful remote control eyesOCT 06

Want to turn the page on your e-reader? Just glance at the lower right corner of the page. And don't worry about scrolling on a long web page. You just read, the page will know what to do. Pando Daily's most excellent Hamish McKenzie shares the story of three guys in a garage who are turning your eyes into powerful remote controls. (Sorry, for now, you'll have to click on the link to make it open.)

Demo of machine that can create anythingAARON COHEN  ·  OCT 05

A recently uncovered video shows the true inventors of 3D printer technology demoing their fantastic magic machine that can create ANYTHING. It appears the video has been kept hidden due to the unnerving power of this invention. Until now.

For a better afternoon, open a tab and let the music from this video play forever. (via ★acoleman)

People vs. PlacesOCT 05

People Vs Places 01

Photographers Stephanie Bassos and Timothy Burkhart are working together on a project called People vs. Places.

This double exposure project allows us to step back from having full control of the image making process and trust in one another while allowing coincidences to happen naturally on film. Stephanie exposes a full roll of 35mm film of only "people," and Timothy reloads the film again into the same camera, to imprint only "places" and locations to the same roll. These images are all the end result of our ongoing series and are unedited negatives straight from the camera.

Many of the images are unremarkable but every once in awhile, boom:

People Vs Places 02

(via co.design)

1850s poster of the planetsOCT 05

I love this poster:

Solar System Poster 1850

(via @ptak)

Self-portrait of a tree as a young saplingOCT 04

This is Cedro di Versailles, a sculpture by Giuseppe Penone, carved out of a five-ton cedar log from Versailles.

Giuseppe Penone

To create the piece, Penone removed the outer rings of the tree to reveal the younger tree within. (via ★spavis)

A video pronunciation guide to ScotchOCT 04

Actor & Scotsman Brian Cox pronounces the names of different kinds of Scotch, including Bruichladdich, Laphroaig, An Cnoc, Auchentoshan, and Lagavulin.

Of course, this is how you really pronounce Laphroaig, courtesy of Pronunciation Manual.

(via @benhammersley)

Popular Hermes scarf designer is a postmanOCT 04

Kermit Oliver is a postal employee who lives in Waco, Texas. He is also the designer of a very popular series of Hermès scarves:

Kermit Oliver Scarf

How that happened is an interesting story.

The sixteen scarves that Kermit has designed for Hermès represent three decades of work. Kermit takes six months to a year to design each one, depending on the intricacy of the image and the research required. When he finally arrives at a finished composition, he paints it onto a ninety-by-ninety-centimeter square of watercolor paper, the same size as the scarves, and sends it by FedEx to Hermès in Paris. After the design atelier there approves it, it moves on to the production facility in Lyon, where each color in the painting is traced onto ninety-centimeter-square slides and, in turn, each slide is etched onto a silk screen. That is to say, every color requires its own screen, and because Kermit's work is both so colorful and so intricate, his scarves are some of the most laborious to print. They are also some of the most beloved. T. Boone Pickens's wife, Madeleine, and Chase Bank executive Elaine Agather are said to be huge collectors. And while there are thousands of scarves designed by Kermit in the world, they are so treasured that few are ever available for purchase at any given time, and the handful that do make it to eBay sell for $800 or $900. An employee of the Hermès store in Houston told me that when a new design of Kermit's is announced, it usually sells out before it even hits the floor.

(via @youngna)

Coca Cola, McDonald's, and... FacebookAARON COHEN  ·  OCT 04

Facebook recently went over a billion users served. In an interview with Businessweek, Mark Zuckerberg mentioned a conversation he had with Facebook board member Marc Andreessen, where Andreessen mentioned the likely only other companies with a billion users are Coca Cola and McDonald's. What does it feel like to have a billion users?

It feels like an honor. We get the honor of building things that a billion people use. I mean, there's no core need. It isn't a core human need to use Facebook. It's a core human need to stay connected with the people you care about. The need to open up and connect is such a deep part of what makes us human. Being in a position where we are the company--or one of the companies--that can play a role in delivering that service is just this ... it's an honor.

The interviewers also asked about how Facebook gets its next billion users and, while Zuckerberg demurred somewhat, Quartz had a look at the version of FB designed for countries without wide smartphone adoption. It runs on WAP and is called Facebook Zero (just like Coke Zero, OMG). Users of the text-only FB are not charged for the data used, and the article posits FB is making the gateway drug argument to the telecoms:

This is because, for the telecoms networks, free Facebook represents a solution to an ever-present existential threat. Their first subscribers were relatively rich; the ones they are gaining now are ever poorer. So the revenue per user is shrinking. At the same time, the amount of data being pushed through their networks is increasing, and customers are demanding faster connection speeds, pushing up the cost of infrastructure. The networks are looking for ways to get more users, and make more money from each one of them.

"The fact is that Facebook has made a compelling argument to operators, which is 'You should give Facebook away [to consumers] for free,'" says Eagle. "I don't know how Facebook is making that case, but if I were Facebook, the argument I'd make is that Facebook is one of the most addictive things on the internet. If you have someone try out Facebook for the first time, it might lead them to want to try the rest of the web, and a lot of these other services they can charge for."

This doesn't necessarily jive with something Zuckerberg said in the Businessweek interview, and has said numerous times in the past. Facebook doesn't want to be the gateway drug to the internet, it wants to be the internet.

The whole vision around News Feed was it should be like a newspaper and shouldn't just be a list of posts your friends are making. I mean we should be able to really show you interesting trends and things that are happening. There are already trillions of connections between friend requests and all the content that's being pushed into the system. At some point, that will start to be a better map of how you navigate the Web than the traditional link structure of the Web. I think there's an opportunity to really build something interesting there.

What's Shane Carruth been up to since Primer?OCT 04

Primer is one of my favorite films. Director Shane Carruth famously made it for just $7,000 and the film found release in 2004, winning the Grand Jury Prize at Sundance that year. Carruth has been fairly quiet since then but he seems to be working on a new film called A Topiary. From a 2010 article on io9:

The website for now is just a place mark as financing has yet to be completed. I'm cautiously optimistic that this can happen soon and couldn't be happier with the filmmakers that have committed to the project so far.

But it's been more than two years since then so I am somewhat less than cautiously optimistic. :( In the meantine, Carruth worked on some effects for the time travel sequences in Looper.

Change Columbus Day to Exploration DayOCT 03

A group of citizens is attempting to change Columbus Day to Exploration Day. Columbus Day has always been a weird holiday, what with CC's slavery and genocide and all, so this seems like a good idea to me. Maggie Koerth-Baker makes the case over at Boing Boing.

The logic is quite neat. Columbus Day is about one guy and the (actually untrue) claim that he was the first person to discover America. Inherently, that's pretty Euro-centric, which is a big part of why it sits awkwardly in a pluralistic country. But exploration is inclusive. The ancestors of Native Hawaiians were explorers who crossed the ocean. The ancestors of Native Americans explored their way across the Bering land bridge and then explored two whole continents. If you look at the history of America, you can see a history of exploration done by many different people, from many different backgrounds. Sometimes we're talking about literal, physical exploration. Other times, the exploring is done in a lab. Or in space. But the point is clear: This country was built on explorers. And it needs explorers for the future.

If you want to help out, sign this petition to Congress or this one to the White House.

Downhill skateboarder hits deerAARON COHEN  ·  OCT 03

Videos of downhill skateboard racing make me nervous, here's one reason why.

"Oh, deer." "That skateboarder deerly missed an accident." "Too bad the skateboarder couldn't deer out of the way." "Did you deer about the downhill skateboarder?" "Deer clear of animals on the track." "Deer we go again!" "No ideer where that came from." "Nothing to fear, but deer itself." "Skateboarder should have been in a lower deer." "Deered up and ready to go." "Deer force of will." "Happy new deer." (via @carveslayer)

Manga CameraAARON COHEN  ·  OCT 03

Manga Camera is an iPhone app that allows you to convert regular photos to Manga style comics. It's fairly simple, and provides several different backgrounds, but I don't think you can convert existing photos. Despite the cat picture rule, below are a few quick examples of Manga Camera in action. Some better examples here.

manga-camera-images.jpg

(via @heyitsgarrett)

The boomerang meteorOCT 03

While driving a couple weeks ago, I happened to catch a meteor shooting across the sky:

Saw one of the coolest things ever tonight: a meteor burning up in the lower atmosphere. Super bright, exploded at the end like a firework.

It turned out that "one of the coolest things ever" wasn't hyperbole. You see, earlier that day over the UK, a meteor streaked across the sky for about 50 seconds:

And then the one I saw happened about two-and-a-half hours later. Spurred by this unlikely coincidence, mathematician Esko Lyytinen of the colorfully named Finnish Fireball Working Group of the Ursa Astronomical Association did some calculations and determined that the two events were actually the same meteor.

He believes a large body grazed the upper atmosphere, dipping to an altitude of 33 miles (53 km) over Ireland before escaping back to space. Because it arrived moving at only about 8 miles (13 km) per second, barely above Earth's escape velocity, it lingered for more than a minute as it crossed the sky. (This explains why some witnesses mistook it for reentering spacecraft debris.)

Lyytinen says the brief atmospheric passage took its toll. As the meteoroid broke apart, its velocity dropped to just 5.7 miles (9.2 km) per second, too slow to make an escape back to space. Instead, it became a temporary satellite of Earth, looping completely around the globe before reentering the atmosphere -- this time for good. "It looks now that the fireball witnessed 155 minutes later in U.S. and Canada, may have been one fragment of the British fireball, most probably the biggest one," Lyytinen explains.

Boomerang Meteor

These earth-grazers are not common but they do happen from time to time. But a visible Earth grazing meteor that enters the atmosphere twice? Unprecedented. So cool! (thx, alex)

Farmer eaten by his own hogsAARON COHEN  ·  OCT 02

A 70 year-old Oregon farmer was eaten by his hogs after somehow being overcome by them during feeding time. An initial search of the pig pen resulted in only the farmer's dentures being found, and coroners were still trying to determine the cause of death, though it seems obvious. (via ★pieratt)

Vintage flannel baseball jerseysOCT 02

Ebbets Field Flannels sells historic baseball jerseys made from "real 1950s-era wool blend baseball cloth".

Ethiopian Clowns

The Clowns were baseball's answer to the Harlem Globetrotters. Players entertained the crowd with various comedic antics, including "shadowball", where they would go through a warm-up routine with no baseball. When the team joined the Negro American League, they dropped the "Ethiopian" moniker and played straight baseball.

(via @tcarmody)

Koyaanisqatsi out on Criterion Blu-ray in DecemberOCT 02

Speaking of Koyaanisqatsi, the Criterion Collection is releasing Godfrey Reggio's Qatsi trilogy on Blu-ray in December. It's the first time that the Qatsis will be available in HD in the US.

ps. Criterion is also releasing Blu-ray editions of Brazil and Following, which is Christopher Nolan's first feature-length film.

8-Bit KoyaanisqatsiOCT 02

The final song from Koyaanisqatsi, remade in 8-bit audio (aka chiptune).

Philip Glass works pretty well in chiptune.

New album from Godspeed You! Black EmperorOCT 02

'Allelujah! Don't Bend! Ascend! is GY!BE's first album since 2002. The album apparently came out of nowhere, with the band releasing it for sale at a concert in Boston yesterday. (via @aaroncoleman0)

Stop-motion Lego Dr. StrangeloveOCT 02

Two sequences from Dr. Strangelove done in Lego.

This is really well done. (via bb)

Changing the color of the Moon with laser pointersOCT 01

Hey, if Randall keeps writing them, I'm gonna keep posting links to them...today's XKCD What If is "If every person on Earth aimed a laser pointer at the Moon at the same time, would it change color?"

Unfortunately, the laser energy flow would turn the atmosphere to plasma, instantly igniting the Earth's surface and killing us all.

Bo Jackson 30 for 30AARON COHEN  ·  OCT 01

I missed this when it was announced in August, but there will be a third series of ESPN's 30 for 30 documentary films, and one scheduled to air in December will feature Bo Jackson.

A close look at the man and marketing campaign that shaped his legacy. Even without winning a Super Bowl or World Series, Bo redefined the role of the athlete in the pop cultural conversation. More than 20 years later, myths and legends still surround Bo Jackson, and his impossible feats still capture our collective imagination.

Good excuse to post this (again?):

(via @sportsguy33)

Super-rich private equity crybabies vs. ObamaOCT 01

In this week's New Yorker, Chrystia Freeland writes about how the ultra-rich have taken a dislike to President Obama and his anti-business policy and rhetoric, even though the President "has served the rich quite well". This article is infuriating, a bunch of very powerful men (and they are all men) sitting around crying about their powerlessness. A few choice quotes:

Cooperman regarded the comments as a declaration of class warfare, and began to criticize Obama publicly. In September, at a CNBC conference in New York, he compared Hitler's rise to power with Obama's ascent to the Presidency, citing disaffected majorities in both countries who elected inexperienced leaders.

Strong argument there. Per Godwin, that should have been the end of it.

Evident throughout the letter is a sense of victimization prevalent among so many of America's wealthiest people. In an extreme version of this, the rich feel that they have become the new, vilified underclass.

Underclass! Boo hoo! Do you want some cheese with that 2005 Petrus?

T. J. Rodgers, a libertarian and a Silicon Valley entrepreneur, has taken to comparing Barack Obama's treatment of the rich to the oppression of ethnic minorities -- an approach, he says, that the President, as an African-American, should be particularly sensitive to.

Yes, I can imagine the President nodding, upset at missing the obvious parallel here. The police chasing hedge fund managers through the streets of lower Manhattan with firehoses is a scene that I will never forget.

[Founding partner of the hedge fund AQR Capital Management Clifford S. Asness] suggested that "hedge funds really need a community organizer," and accused the White House of "bullying" the financial sector.

Clifford S. Asness swinging from the bathroom door knob by his underwear. Clifford S. Asness called "Assness" in trigonometry class. Nude photos taken of Clifford S. Asness in the locker room and distributed to the freshman girls. Clifford S. Asness teased so mercilessly about his acne that he has to stay home from school throwing up from the emotional pain of being so thoroughly and callously rejected by one's peers.

In 2010, the private-equity billionaire Stephen Schwarzman, of the Blackstone Group, compared the President's as yet unsuccessful effort to eliminate some of the preferential tax treatment his sector receives to Hitler's invasion of Poland.

Hitler again! Obama is obviously a fascist communist.

"You know, the largest and greatest country in the free world put a forty-seven-year-old guy that never worked a day in his life and made him in charge of the free world," Cooperman said. "Not totally different from taking Adolf Hitler in Germany and making him in charge of Germany because people were economically dissatisfied.

Hitler, take three. Stick with what you know.

He was a seventy-two-year-old world-renowned cardiologist; his wife was one of the country's experts in women's medicine. Together, they had a net worth of around ten million dollars. "It was shocking how tight he was going to be in retirement," Cooperman said. "He needed four hundred thousand dollars a year to live on. He had a home in Florida, a home in New Jersey. He had certain habits he wanted to continue to pursue.

Shocking. Needed. Certain habits.

People don't realize how wealthy people self-tax. If you have a certain cause, an art museum or a symphony, and you want to support it, it would be nice if you had the choice.

We didn't realize that. And it's such an either-or thing too...can't pay your taxes *and* help the Met buy a Vermeer.

Molotov cocktail exploding in slow motionOCT 01

This doesn't look so impressive in slow motion but when it switches to super slow motion around 2:00, watching the gasoline attempt to outrun the flames is really cool.

(via devour)

It's Decorative Gourd Season, MotherfuckersOCT 01

It's October and NYC's weather was particularly crisp this morning so it's time for the annual reread of Colin Nissan's classic McSweeney's piece, It's Decorative Gourd Season, Motherfuckers.

I don't know about you, but I can't wait to get my hands on some fucking gourds and arrange them in a horn-shaped basket on my dining room table. That shit is going to look so seasonal. I'm about to head up to the attic right now to find that wicker fucker, dust it off, and jam it with an insanely ornate assortment of shellacked vegetables. When my guests come over it's gonna be like, BLAMMO! Check out my shellacked decorative vegetables, assholes. Guess what season it is -- fucking fall. There's a nip in the air and my house is full of mutant fucking squash.

So seasonal.

An oral history of CheersOCT 01

Amy Poehler says it's the best show on television and GQ has a long oral history of Cheers.

On The Jeffersons, you would give your notes to the director, and he'd go, "Right, right," and then turn around and go to the actors and say, "Oh, those fucking writers. They want to change this." And then the director would come back [to the writers] and go, "Oh, those actors. They won't do a thing I ask them." You get this weird us-against-them [mentality].

And when we got to Cheers, everybody could talk to everybody. Now, granted, if you were smart you had a sense of where you were on the totem pole, you watched your comments and obviously deferred to the bosses. But if I saw something that Shelley had done that I thought was particularly good, or if a writer had a suggestion for a way she might be able to do it better, you got to tell her that. The only rule was you had to do it so everybody could hear; there were no private conversations. It had to be open with everybody. It really fostered this feeling that we were all in it together.

I watched Cheers all the time when I was a kid...I've seen each episode at least twice. For me, it was the best show until Seinfeld came along. Haven't seen an episode for probably 15 years though. I wonder if it holds up as well as Poehler claims.

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